ANTHY102-18B (HAM)

New Zealand and the Pacific

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Anthropology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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How might an anthropologist explain New Zealand society and culture, especially relations between its indigenous, settler, and migrant communities? This course pursues that theme via the lens of how our archipelago has been imagined and transformed over time, from the ancient isolate named Aotearoa by Maori, through its historical role as a distant colony of Britain, and into the present with the claim that it is now “a Pacific nation”.

Academic rationale:
  • To provide a practically-oriented anthropology course at first-year level that complements our other discipline-focussed course (ANTH-101 Exploring Cultures: Introduction to Anthropology).
  • To offer an innovative paper that can be co-listed by other programmes at this University - e.g. Maori and Indigenous Studies, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, and New Zealand Studies/Akoranga Aotearoa.
  • To illustrate our programme’s national and international reputation for teaching and research excellence from the perspective of sociocultural anthropology, with a focus on Aotearoa/New Zealand and Te Moananui-a-Kiwa/The Pacific.
Employment Relevance
This course is especially relevant to professional employment in: tourism; communications & media; teaching; Maori, Pakeha, Pasifika and immigrant communities; social work; ethnic relations; health & medicine; business; pastoral care; diplomatic service; aid & development; museums & cultural heritage; Treaty and historical research; the armed services; police; the law; politics & public service.
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Paper Structure

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All students are expected to attend two lectures each week plus one tutorial per week.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • demonstrate a mature understanding of the New Zealand and Pacific social and cultural contexts they daily interact with, and of this country’s interconnections with the wider world.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • appreciate the relevance of anthropological perspectives for understanding human communities at the national, regional, and global levels, especially in combination with other social science disciplines.
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  • illustrate improved abilities in listening, reading, discussing, writing, and analyzing in relation to social and cultural issues, consistent with international academic best-practice at university level.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Please see below.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 70:30. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 30% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 70:30 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 30% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Nine Weekly Tutorials
9
2. Test One
8 Aug 2018
11:00 AM
30
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
3. Test Two
19 Sep 2018
11:00 AM
30
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
4. Moodle Quiz
18 Jul 2018
5:00 PM
1
5. Exam
30
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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All students should purchase from Campus Copy the Course Readings for ANTH102-18B. There are 22 different readings in this book, which should be read and studied in their order of occurrence, each with its corresponding lecture and tutorial. To succeed in this paper, to ensure success in the two tests and exam, you must keep your reading up to date!
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Online Support

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Moodle
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Workload

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You should plan on three hours per week for lectures and tutorial, at least four hours per week for the prescribed course readings, as well as time for test preparation and studying for the examination. This averages out to around ten hours per week.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ANTH102

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