ANTHY201-19A (HAM)

Ethnicity and Identity

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Anthropology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rachel.gosnell-maddock@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
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Paper Description

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The way that humans categorise ourselves and others powerfully underpins historical and contemporary conflicts and inequalities. Understanding human constructions of sameness and difference thereforeenables critical insight into many issues the world is facing today. This paper asks, how are the categories of ethnicity, race, and nationality constructed? How are such identity categories deployed to unify, organise, or divide societies? And how do these divisions create and reproduce social inequities?

Drawing tools from social, biological, and medical anthropology, we will consider a range of case studies to explore how ethnicity and related categories marginalise, become embodied, or distribute power in particular ways within Aotearoa New Zealand and globally. A particular focus of this course is health, which we will use as a lens through which to unpack issues of ethnicity, race and racism. Health offers a useful way for us to understand the relationships between the socially constructed and the biological, as well as how these relationships are often essentialised and misrecognised as innate biological differences between races, rather than the effects of racism. This will include case studies of ethnic disparities in health outcomes in NZ/USA, the way medical knowledge is often predicated on biological assumptions of race, the impacts of the colonial state care and medical institutions for indigenous people.
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Paper Structure

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There is a lecture and a tutorial that you must attend each week.

Tutorials begin in the second week of the semester.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Explain the definitions of and differences between key concepts of ethnicity, race, nationality

    Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:Explain the definitions of and differences between key concepts of ethnicity, race, nationality, ancestry, cultures, populations, indigeneity
    Reflect meaningfully on their own positioning and identity in relation to ethnicity or nationality
    Answer the following questions:

    How are notions of ethnicity, race, or nationalism constructed, deployed, and reproduced?
    How are categories like ethnicity, race, nationality, indigeneity, implicated in the construction of individual and group identity, belonging, and exclusion?
    What is the relationship between ethnicity/race and biology?
    How do constructs of ethnicity, race, or nationalism become embodied and naturalised?
    What is racism, where does it come from, and what are its effects?

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Reflect meaningfully on their own positioning and identity in relation to ethnicity or nationality
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Answer the following questions:
    • How are notions of ethnicity, race, or nationalism constructed, deployed, and reproduced?
    • How are categories like ethnicity, race, nationality, indigeneity, implicated in the construction of individual and group identity, belonging, and exclusion?
    • What is the relationship between ethnicity/race and biology?
    • How do constructs of ethnicity, race, or nationalism become embodied and naturalised?
    • What is racism, where does it come from, and what are its effects?
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:0. There is no final exam.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Autobiographical reflection
12 Mar 2019
4:00 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Take-home test
2 Apr 2019
4:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Briefing report
12 May 2019
4:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Final test
29 May 2019
10:00 AM
25
  • In Class: In Lecture
5. Tutorial attendance and participation
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Recommended reading:

Thomas Hylland Eriksen author. 2010. Ethnicity and Nationalism: Anthropological Perspectives. Third edition. London; New York: Pluto Press.

Week 1

McIntosh, Tracey. 2001. ‘Hibiscus in the Flax Bush: The Maori-Pacific Island Interface’. In Tangata o Te Moana Nui, edited by Cluny Macpherson, Paul Spoonley, and Melani Anae, 141–54. Palmerston North, N.Z.: Dunmore Press.

Matthewman, Steve. 2017. ‘Pākehā Ethnicity: The Politics of White Privilege’. In A Land of Milk and Honey? Making Sense of Aotearoa New Zealand, edited by Avril Bell, Vivienne Elizabeth, Tracey McIntosh, and Matt Wynyard, 83–94. Auckland: Auckland University Press.

McIntosh, Peggy, 1989. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack. Wellesley MA: Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, 7 pp. https://nationalseedproject.org/white-privilege-unpacking-the-invisible-knapsack

Week 2

Jenkins, Richard, 2002. Imagined but Not Imaginary: Ethnicity and Nationalism in the Modern World. In Jeremy MacClancey, ed., Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 114-128.

Anae, Melani. 1997. ‘Towards a NZ—Born Samoan Identity: Some Reflections on “Labels”’. Pacific Health Dialog 4 (2): 128–137.

Week 3

Harrison, F. 2002. ‘Unravelling ‘Race’ for the Twenty-First Century’. In J. MacClancey (ed.), Exotic No More. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp.145-166. ISBN 0226500136

Smedley, Audrey, and Brian D. Smedley. 2005. ‘Race as Biology Is Fiction, Racism as a Social Problem Is Real: Anthropological and Historical Perspectives on the Social Construction of Race.’ American Psychologist 60 (1): 16.

Recommended reading:
Board, AAA Executive. 1998. ‘AAA Statement on Race’. American Anthropologist 100 (3): 712–713.

Week 4

Barth, Fredrik. 1996. ‘Ethnic Groups and Boundaries’. Excerpt. In Ethnicity, edited by John Hutchinson and Anthony D. Smith, 75–82. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McCormack, Fiona Elisabeth. 2017. ‘Fear, Silence, and Telling: Catholic Identity in Northern Ireland’. Anthropology and Humanism 42 (1): 50–71.

Week 5

Bell, Avril. 2017. ‘Imagining Aotearoa New Zealand: The Politics of National Imaginings’. In A Land of Milk and Honey? Making Sense of Aotearoa New Zealand, edited by Avril Bell, Vivienne Elizabeth, Tracey McIntosh, and Matt Wynyard, 57–68. Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Paradies, Yin. 2016. ‘Beyond Black and White: Essentialism, Hybridity and Indigeneity’. In Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, 44–54. Routledge.

Week 6

Kertzer, David I., and Dominique Arel. 2002. ‘Censuses, Identity Formation, and the Struggle for Political Power’. In Census and Identity: the Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Language in National Census, edited by David I. Kertzer and Dominique Arel, 1–36. Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Broman, Patrick. 2018. ‘Measuring the Majority: Counting Europeans in the New Zealand Census’. New Zealand Sociology 33 (3): 83.

Recommended reading:
American Anthropological Association. 1997. ‘Response to OMB Directive 15: Race and Ethnic Standards for Federal Statistics and Administrative Reporting’. http://s3.amazonaws.com/rdcms-aaa/files/production/public/FileDownloads/pdfs/cmtes/minority/upload/AAA_Response_OMB1997.pdf.

Week 9

Holmes, Seth. 2013. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press. Chapter Four “How the Poor Suffer”: Embodying the Violence Continuum. p101-120

Holmes, Seth. 2013. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press. Chapter Six “Because They’re Lower to the Ground”: Naturalising Social Suffering. p155-181.

Week 11

Gravlee, C.C. 2009. ‘How Race Becomes Biology: Embodiment of Social Inequality’. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 139: 47–57.

Thayer, Zaneta M., and Christopher W. Kuzawa. 2015. ‘Ethnic Discrimination Predicts Poor Self-Rated Health and Cortisol in Pregnancy: Insights from New Zealand’. Social Science & Medicine 128: 36–42.

Week 12

Pihama, Leonie, Paul Reynolds, Cherryl Smith, John Reid, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, and Rihi Te Nana. 2014. ‘Positioning Historical Trauma Theory within Aotearoa New Zealand’. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 10 (3): 248–262.

Anderson, Warwick. 2007. ‘The Colonial Medicine of Settler States: Comparing Histories of Indigenous Health’. Health and History 9 (2): 144–154.

Week 13

Martin, Savannah. 2016. ‘Bringing Ourselves Back from Extinction in Academia: Becoming an Indigenous Scholar’. In The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue, edited by William F. Tate, Nancy Staudt, and Ashley Macrander, 201–215. Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

George, Lily 2013. Ka Hao Te Rangatahi – Paying it Forward. Extract from: Metge, Joan, Jeff Sissons, and Lily George. 2013. ‘Whakapapa - New Zealand Anthropology’. Sites: A Journal of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies 10 (1): 20–29. https://doi.org/10.11157/sites-vol10iss1id228.

George, Lily 2018. Stirring up Silence: What does decolonizing anthropology in Aotearoa New Zealand really mean? Commoning Ethnography 1(1):107-112

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Online Support

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This paper is supported by moodle.
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Workload

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You should spend 10 hours a week on this paper. This includes lecture and tutorial attendance and reading for the paper.
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