ANTHY301-21B (HAM)

Radical Thinking in Anthropology

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Anthropology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rachel.gosnell-maddock@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: nat.enright@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

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Paper Description

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Introduction

Radical Thinking in Anthropology examines key theoretical concepts and publications in the discipline of sociocultural anthropology. The aim of the paper is to increase students’ capacity to analyse contemporary global concerns through the lens of anthropological theory.

The course will introduce students to theory in anthropology and the social sciences from the 19th century to the present. Students will investigate paradigm shifts over the history of the discipline, including contributions from minority and indigenous scholars.

Students will grapple with disciplinary debates on topics such as evolutionism, functionalism, structuralism, Marxism, feminism, colonialism, networks, non-human relationships and digital life, religion and ontology, development, health, violence and indigenous knowledge. Students will evaluate the discipline of anthropology in terms of its epistemology, ethics and relevance to real-world problems.

Radical Thinking in Anthropology is worth 15 points and can be taken as part of a major in Anthropology, or as a support paper in any Arts, Social Science, Psychology, Law, Education, Maori/Pacific and Indigenous Studies, or other programme within the university.

This paper is taught by Dr. Bronwyn Isaacs. Dr Isaacs' email is bronwyn.isaacs@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Structure

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The paper structure in 2021 is blended online/face-to-face and has three main components.

1) Weekly Videos. Two videos of approximately 25 minutes each are released on Monday. Viewing the videos is required before Wednesday's Zoom Discussion.

2) Weekly Zoom Discussion. This is the "lecture" on 2pm Wednesdays. The Zoom Discussion is an interactive session in which students ask Dr. Isaacs questions regarding the week's videos. Each student is to come to the discussion with a question prepared and enter the question in the group chat box at the start of the meeting. The Zoom discussion will usually take less than one hour.

3) Weekly Tutorial. The weekly tutorial is a space to focus on the week's assigned readings. The tutorial is held on Fridays (11am-12pm) in MS4.G.02

Attending all three components of the course is required. Not participating will affect a student's participation grade. Attendance will be noted. If circumstances mean that you cannot attend the weekly Zoom Discussion or Tutorial, please contact either Dr. Isaacs in advance of the meeting/tutorial.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Learning Outcomes
    • understand the major theoretical developments in the discipline of anthropology, as well as of the historical context in which such paradigms took form and gained ascendancy
    • comprehend the ways in which theoretical assumptions and biases may influence ethnographic and ethnological observations and interpretations of empirical data.
    • read, think, and write critically about how anthropologists have historically and currently understood and represented their research participants and the cultures they belong to.
    • should they wish, pursue graduate studies in anthropology with an important building block in their disciplinary formation.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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There are five main categories of assessment in this paper.

1. Participation

2. Weekly Responses (8 required)

3. Op-Ed (short response)

3. Annotated Bibliography

4. Final Essay

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Weekly Responses to the Week's Assigned Readings
Sum of All
15 Oct 2021
7:59 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Week Two Reading Response
23 Jul 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Week Three Reading Response
30 Jul 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Week Four Reading Response
6 Aug 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Week Five Reading Response
13 Aug 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Week Six Reading Response
20 Aug 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Week Seven Reading Response
10 Sep 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Week Eight Reading Response
17 Sep 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
9. Week Nine Reading Response
24 Sep 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
10. Week Ten Reading Response
1 Oct 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
11. Week Eleven Reading Response
8 Oct 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
12. Week Twelve Reading Response
15 Oct 2021
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
13. Op-Ed (Short Response)
8 Aug 2021
No set time
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
14. Annotated Bibliography
5 Sep 2021
No set time
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
15. Final Essay
15 Oct 2021
No set time
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
16. Tutorial Participation
10
17. Lecture Participation: Videos and Zoom Discussion
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Week 2: Evolutionism

Firmin, Antenor, J. 1885 [2002]. “Anthropology as a Discipline” & “Artificial Ranking of the Human Races” (excerpts) in The Equality of the Human Races. University of Illinois Press: Urbana and Chicago: . 2-13 & 139-147.

Morgan, Henry, L. 1877 [2012]. “Ethnical Periods” from Ancient Society, in McGee &Warms ed. McGraw Hill, New York: 45-56.

Week 3: Functionalism

Durkheim, Emile. 1855 [2012]. “What is a social fact? ”, in McGee &Warms ed., McGraw Hill, New York :78-8.

Papakura, Makereti. 1938. Old Time Maori , Victor Gollanz Ltd, NZTEC [excerpts]

Week 4: Dialectical Materialism

Marx & Engles 1845-46 [2012] “Feuerbach. Opposition of the Materialist and Idealists Outlook”, in McGee &Warms ed. McGraw Hill, New York: 57- 73.

Marx, Karl. (1867). The fetishism of commodities and the secret thereof. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, 1: 71-83.

Week 5: Bureaucracy & Government

Weber, Max 1922 “Class, Status, Party” McGee &Warms ed., McGraw Hill, New York : 97-110.

Foucault, Michel. 1965 [2012] “Panopticism” in Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Asylum, Vintage: New York:195-228.

Week 6: Culture & Practice

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1980 [2012]. Structures, Habitus, Practices (1980) in in McGee &Warms ed., McGraw Hill, New York :492-507.

Geertz, Clifford, 1973. “Thick Description: toward an interpretive theory of culture” , in The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays, Basic Books: New York: 3-20.

Week 7: Feminism, Sex & Gender

Butler, Judith., 1988. Performative acts and gender constitution: An essay in phenomenology and feminist theory. Theatre journal, 40(4): 519-531.

Abu‐Lughod, Lila. "Do Muslim women really need saving? Anthropological reflections on cultural relativism and its others." American anthropologist 104, no. 3 (2002): 783-790.

Week 8: Globalisation & Development

Appadurai, Arjun. 1990 [2012] “Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Economy” McGee &Warms ed., McGraw Hill, New York : 567-586

Ferguson, James. 2006. “Africa and the World” in Global shadows. Durham: Duke University Press: 1-23

Week Nine: Indigeneity, Minority Scholarship & Activism

Hopa, Ngapare K. 1988 The Anthropologist as Tribal Advocate, Centre for Maaori Studies and Research, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealandpp. 1-23 & 56-59.

White, Geoffrey M., and Ty Kāwika Tengan. "Disappearing worlds: Anthropology and cultural studies in Hawai'i and the Pacific." The Contemporary Pacific (2001): 381-416 (selections).

Week Ten: Health, Violence, Security

Ortner, Sherry B.2016. “Dark anthropology and its others: Theory since the eighties." HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 6 (1): 47-73.

Paul Farmer, 2004. “An Anthropology of Structural Violence.” Current Anthropology 45(3): 305–325.

Week 11: Religion and Ontology

Rudnyckyj, Daromir. "Spiritual economies: Islam and neoliberalism in contemporary Indonesia." Cultural anthropology 24, no. 1 (2009): 104-141.

Kohn, Eduardo. (2007). How dogs dream: Amazonian natures and the politics of transspecies engagement. American ethnologist, 34(1), 3-24.

Week 12: Networks, Science and the Digital
Latour, Bruno, and Steve Woolgar. 1979. The “Anthropology” of Science. In Laboratory Lives: The Construction of Scientific Facts, Princeton University Press Princeton: 27-32.

Bonilla, Y. and Rosa, J., 2015. # Ferguson: Digital protest, hashtag ethnography, and the racial politics of social media in the United States. American ethnologist, 42(1): 4-17

Required readings will be made available on Moodle.

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Other Resources

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Studiosity is a free online platform for all undergraduate and taught postgraduate students, available 24/7. Each student has access to additional writing support provided by trained tutors. Upload a sample of your writing to Studiosity and receive written feedback within 24 hours.

https://www.waikato.ac.nz/teaching-and-learning/student-learning/appointments/studiosity

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Online Support

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Class announcements will be sent through Moodle
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Workload

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You are expected to spend 12 hours per week on this paper - this includes 3 hours of class and 9 hours reading, studying and writing.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: ANTH101 or ANTHY101 or ANTH102 or ANTHY102.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ANTH301

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