APPLN501-21A (HAM)

Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

30 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Arts
General and Applied Linguistics

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: alexandra.cullen@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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The overall aim of the course is to provide students with a critical awareness of the potential paradigms, methodologies, issues and skills that relate to carrying out research in the area of applied linguistics.

Links between teaching and research

In addition to drawing upon published material in the area of research methodology, this course will draw upon my own experience as a published researcher in the area of genre studies, a principal writer for national curriculum projects and book author. My publications can be viewed on the University’s research database at http://www.waikato.ac.nz/php/research.php?mode=show&author=102676

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Paper Structure

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The paper involves one three-hour lecture per week and will require addition tutorial help either during the office hour or by individual appointment. Because this is a masters-level paper, your lectures, and individual reading and assignment work will together involve at least 18 hours hours per week.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • assess the significance of the various approaches, styles and data collection methods employed in applied linguistics research;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • determine which methodologies are appropriate in specified research contexts;
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  • develop research questions appropriate to specific issues in applied linguistics;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • conduct effective literature searches in order to determine what research has already been done in specific areas;
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  • critically review research literature;
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  • design detailed research proposals;
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  • organize, present and reference research material in ways that are appropriate to different contexts.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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There is no examination for this course. The course will be assessed by means of five assignments, which students are expected to complete in order to meet the requirements of the course. Assignments must be word-processed (double-spaced) and students must retain a copy for their records. Quotes, in-text referencing (citations) and reference lists (and the bibliography in Assignment 5) must follow the conventions of the APA Manual (6th ed.). The following link takes you to the University Library’s APA Guide (7th edition) hhttps://www.waikato.ac.nz/library/study/referencing//styles/apa/ Because the course operates outside of regular office hours, assignments may be submitted by email as attachments or handed to the lecturer in class. Marked assignments will be returned in class.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment 1
15 Mar 2021
No set time
15
  • Email: Lecturer
2. Assignment 2
12 Apr 2021
No set time
15
  • Email: Lecturer
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
3. Assignment 3
3 May 2021
No set time
15
  • Email: Lecturer
4. Assignment 4
31 May 2021
No set time
30
  • Email: Lecturer
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
5. Assignment 5
21 Jun 2021
No set time
25
  • Email: Lecturer
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Required Course text:

Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2011/2017). Research Methods in Education (7th/8th ed.). London and New York: Routledge/ Falmer.

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Recommended Readings

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Research Methodology Texts Available from the Library - Library CALL numbers provided

Bogdan, R. C., & Biklen, S. K. (2007). Qualitative research for education: An introduction to theory and methods. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. LB1028. B56.1982

Brown, J. D., & Rodgers, T. S. (2002). Doing second language research. Oxford teachers’ handbooks series. Oxford. P118.2 .B77 2002

Burns, A. (1999). Collaborative action research for English language teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. EDUC. LIB. LB1028.24.B87.1999

Dornyei, Z. (2007). Research methods in applied linguistics: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies. Oxford: New York, NY: Oxford University Press.P129.D67 2007

Duff, P. (2008). Case study research in applied linguistics. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.P129.D84 2008

Gass, S. M., & Mackey, A. (2007). Data elicitation for second and foreign language research. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.P53.755.G37 2007

Heigham, J. A., & Croker, R. A. (2009). Qualitative research in applied linguistics: A practical introduction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.P129.Q35 2009

Holliday, A. (2007). Doing and writing qualitative research (2nd ed.). London ;Thousand Oaks: Sage. H62.H54 2007

Hitchcock, G., & Hughes, D. (1995). Research and the teacher: A qualitative introduction to school-based research. (2nd Edition). London: Routledge. EDUC LIB LB1028.H51.1995

Johnson, D. (1992). Approaches to research in second language learning. New York: Longman. P118.2.J64 1991

Nunan, D. (1992) Research methods in language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. P53.N87 1992

Paltridge, B., & Phakiti, A. (Eds.) (2010). Continuum companion to research methods in applied linguistics. London: Continuum. P129.C64 2010

Schachter, J., & Gass, S. (Eds.), (1989) Second language classroom research: Issues and opportunities. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. P53.S385 1996

Spradley, J. P. (1979). The ethnographic interview. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. GN346.3.S66 1979

Spradley, J. P. (1980). Participant observation. New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston. GN346.4.S68 1980

Journals and periodicals

Title Hardcopy Full-text electronic AccessLocation / Call Number
Annual Review of Applied LinguisticsyesyesLevel 1
P129.A615
Applied Linguistics yesyesLevel 1
P129.A652
Applied PsycholinguisticsnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Australian Review of Applied Linguistics (ARAL)yesyesLevel 3
A129.P939
Asian EFL JournalnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Assessing WritingnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Computer Assisted Language LearningnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
ELT JournalyesyesLanguage Institute, Level 1
PE1128.A2E5
International Journal of Applied LinguisticsnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
IRAL, International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching yesyesLevel 1
P51.165
Journal of English for Academic PurposesnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only

Journal of Pragmatics
cancelled after 2002yesLevel 1
P99.4.P72J68
Journal of Second Language WritingnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Language Learningcancelled after 2002yesLevel 1
P1.L288
Language TeachingnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Language Learning & TechnologynoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Language Teaching Research (LTR)yesyesLevel 1
PB35.L347
Language TestingyesyesLevel 1
P53.4.L287
Linguistics and Education noyesNo holdings, electronic access only

Language Learning & Technology
noyesNo holdings, electronic access only
Language Teaching Research (LTR)yesyesLevel 1
PB35.L347
Language TestingyesyesLevel 1
P53.4.L287
Linguistics and Education noyesNo holdings, electronic access only
New Zealand Studies in Applied LinguisticsyesyesLevel 1
P129.N532
Reading in a Foreign Languageno yesNo holdings, electronic access only
Studies in Second Language AcquisitionnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
SystemnoyesNo holdings, electronic access only
TESOL Journalyes
ended 2003
noLevel 1
PE1128.A2T3365
TESOL QuarterlyyesyesLevel 1
PE1128.A2T336
Text and Talk (formerly ‘Text’)cancelled 2011yesLevel 1
P302.T355
World Englishesno yesNo holdings, electronic access only


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Other Resources

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Sage Research Methods is an useful database containing definitions, readings, videos and examples of the concepts and practices taught in this course. Sage Research Methods can be accessed via the link on the course Moodle page.
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Online Support

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There is an online Moodle site for this course. Moodle can be accessed via iWaikato. Lecture PowerPoint frames and related handouts, important dates and the paper outline are all available from this site.

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Workload

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This is a post-graduate course that is assessed throughout Semester A. Your workload will be easier to manage if you attend class, review lecture material regularly, read regularly and widely, and allow yourself plenty of lead-in time for the assignments. You should also make sure that you take advantage of the individual assistance that will be provided as necessary. As stated under the Course Structure, the time required for lectures and individual work will be at least 18 hours per week.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: APPL501, APPL511, APPL512.

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