ARTSC103-20B (HAM)

Rights and Reason

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Arts

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: monique.mulder@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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Students will develop critical thinking skills by reasoning about human rights. Questions about human rights that require critical thinking include:

  • What do we mean when we talk about human rights?
  • Does the concept of human rights even make sense?
  • What particular rights do people have, and why? For example, do we have the right not to be enslaved, the right not to be tortured, the right to express our gender identity and sexual preferences, the right to internet access?
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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught partly online. There are no lectures: content will be delivered online through Moodle, in the form of online lessons with readings embedded in them. All readings will be made available on Moodle.

Tutorials: each student is expected to sign up (through Moodle) to a tutorial group by the end of Week One. There are three types of tutorial to choose from:

1. Face-to-face. In their weekly tutorial, students will work in groups to complete worksheets, with a tutor available to help. We have found that working through carefully-designed tutorial worksheets is an excellent way of developing and practicing critical thinking skills.

2. Zoom. Weekly Zoom tutorials are like face-to-face tutorials except that they are online, so you can attend them without being on-campus. Group discussions on Zoom will be held in breakout rooms, with the tutor roaming between breakout rooms.

3. Moodle forum discussions. Unlike face-to-face or Zoom tutorials, these do not require you to participate at a particular time each week, but you will be expected to contribute in writing to forum discussions every week.

After the end of Week One, it will not be possible to change your chosen tutorial option, so you should think carefully about what will suit you best. Feel free to consult the convenor of the paper (Justine Kingsbury) about the different options if you are in need of advice.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Recognise and paraphrase arguments in written texts regarding contemporary human rights issues
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Evaluate arguments discussing the basis of human rights, moral obligations and duties, presented both orally and in written texts
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Argue for a conclusion, both verbally and in writing
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  • Identify and utilise high quality information sources online
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment 1
27 Jul 2020
11:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment 2
24 Aug 2020
11:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Essay Plan
21 Sep 2020
11:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Tutorial presentation
15
  • Other: Oral presentation to tutorial group
5. Essay
16 Oct 2020
11:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Tutorial participation
10
7. Online lessons
15
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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There is no textbook for this paper. All readings will be made available through Moodle. Note that most of the readings are embedded in the online lessons.
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Other Resources

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Online lessons and audio-visual material will be made available through Moodle.
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Online Support

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Readings, online lessons and audio-visual material will be made available through Moodle.
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Workload

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Students are expected to spend an average of ten hours per week (including mid-semester break) on this paper, including tutorial time, reading time, time spent working through lessons on Moodle, and time spent completing assignments.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: CSMAX170

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