BIOL313-16B (TGA)

Applied Freshwater Ecology

20 Points

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Faculty of Science and Engineering
Te Mātauranga Pūtaiao me te Pūkaha
School of Science

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

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Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Librarian(s)

: cward@waikato.ac.nz
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Paper Description

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This 20 point paper is an introduction to the ecology of lakes and rivers. Topics covered include the structure and function of major freshwater communities, fish and fisheries, human impacts, and the management of inland waters. A concise version of the course outline is available here.
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Paper Structure

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The course is taught through lectures, field trips and laboratory/workshops. Attendance at field trips/labs is essential. Attendance at all lectures is expected.

Attendance on the two field trips and at all laboratory sessions is essential.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Conduct fieldwork in standing and running water environments
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Recognise key flora and fauna of freshwaters
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  • Synthesize field/lab data related to freshwaters
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  • Engage in informed discussion related to:
    • The complexity and functioning of freshwater ecosystems
    • The science behind management/conservation issues
    • Possible solutions to challenges faced by freshwater ecosystems
      (e.g. eutrophication, global climate change)
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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The dates indicated for assessment procedures will normally be adhered to. Any changes to the dates will be made in consultation with the class at least one week prior to the original date. Individuals handing in work late must gain approval from the appropriate lecturer otherwise they will be penalised at 5 % per day.

Because we take issues relating to academic honesty and plagiarism seriously, we expect students in this paper to submit all major pieces of internal assessment (i.e. field trip reports) in hard copy and via Turnitin (accessed through Moodle), a programme that identifies similarities between an individual's work and the papers, books and websites in the Turnitin database. Turnitin results may show where students need extra learning support, as well as sometimes providing the evidence for any disciplinary action. A hard copy of all assignments must also be deposited at the locations described below.

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Internally Assessed Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:1. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 50% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:1 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 50% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of internal markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Phytoplankton lab report
12 Aug 2016
4:30 PM
6
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box
2. Zooplankton lab report
12 Aug 2016
4:30 PM
6
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box
3. Test 1
1 Sep 2016
2:00 PM
20
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
4. Lakes report
9 Sep 2016
2:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box
5. Benthos lab report
23 Sep 2016
4:30 PM
8
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box
6. Test 2
29 Sep 2016
2:00 PM
20
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
7. Streams report
7 Sep 2016
4:30 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box
Internal Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Recommended Readings

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Moss 1998. Ecology of freshwaters, 3rd edition. Blackwell Science, London.
Wetzel, R.G. 2001. Limnology: Lake and river ecosystems. 3rd edition. Academic Press, San Diego.
Harding, J., P. Mosley, C. Pearson and B. Sorrell (eds), 2004. Freshwaters of New Zealand, NZ Hydrological Society/NZ Limnological Society, Caxton Press, Christchurch.
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Online Support

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This paper has a Moodle page (http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz) where you will be able to access pdfs of lecture notes and Powerpoint presentations, lecture recordings, and assessment materials. There are also discussion forums where you can both ask and answer questions.

PLEASE NOTE: Moodle will be used for class notices and it is your responsibility to check the site regularly. Instructions provided on Moodle and in lectures are considered to be given to the class as a whole.
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Workload

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Lectures: 39 hours, labs/workshops: 18 hours, field trips: 2 of approx 8-12 hours duration. 80 hours non-contact work which includes 30 hours for lab and workshop reports.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper is linked to BIOL312 Applied terrestrial ecology and BIOL314 Marine biology and monitoring.

Please note that BIOL212 is not a required prerequisite for TGA students, despite what the field below says. We can't edit this out!

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Prerequisite(s)

BIOL212

Corequisite(s)

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