CHEMY100-20A (HAM)

Chemistry in Context

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science

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  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
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Paper Description

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This is an introductory course assuming minimal chemistry background for students who are non-chemistry majors. The course covers a broad range of chemical concepts that are fundamental to the sciences and engineering. A strong emphasis is made to teach concepts through real-life examples from the world around us.

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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions. Chemistry is an inherently practical subject and there is a focus on students gaining the necessary laboratory skills to succeed in their chosen Science major or Engineering specified programme.

Lectures are held three times per week and are supported using the Xorro student response system, which allows students to answer questions during lectures to ensure that they understand the material being taught. To participate, students will need an internet capable device (smartphone, tablet, laptop, etc). The lecture theatres are all WiFi enabled and there are no data charges for accessing the Xorro website on campus: http://q.xorro.com/uow-chemy100. Students may also access Xorro using their 4G connection if they prefer.

Tutorials are held for students to get assistance with the weekly problem sheets and all other aspects of the course.

Laboratory sessions begin on the first formal day of semester i.e. Monday 2 March. Students must attend their allocated laboratory session unless they have written documentation (e.g. medical certificate) explaining why they couldn’t attend their normal session. A short test is held at the beginning of each laboratory session so it is important that students arrive promptly.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the subatomic composition of atoms, isotopes and ions, and their relationship to atomic number, average atomic mass and charge
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  • Use the structure of the periodic table to account for atomic properties including electronegativity, size, and electron configuration
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  • Predict the reactivity of atoms and the type of bonding between pairs of atoms, based on the configuration of the corresponding valence electrons
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  • Solve quantitative problems (stoichiometric) involving chemical formulas and equations
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  • Account for the melting point, boiling point and solubility of substances in terms of the intermolecular interactions exhibited by the individual molecules or ions
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  • Use the ideal gas equation to calculate changes in temperature, pressure, volume and amount of gas
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  • Write equilibrium expressions and convert between solubility and solubility constants
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  • Predict the direction that an equilibrium reaction will respond based on the reaction quotient and using Le Chatelier’s principle
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  • Convert between [H+] or [OH-] and pH
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  • Rationalise the strength of an acid or base in terms of its Ka/Kb or pKa/pKb value
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  • Identify molecules, atoms and ions that are reduced or oxidized in redox reactions
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  • Predict the spontaneity of redox reactions based on standard reduction potentials
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  • Describe the process of corrosion and discuss strategies for its inhibition
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  • Identify common organic functional groups
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  • Use IUPAC nomenclature to name inorganic compounds and to name and draw organic molecules
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  • Describe the production of fuels from crude oil and discuss the suitability of different fuels based on their physical properties
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  • Rationalise the physical properties of polymers based on their chemical structure
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  • Discuss common water quality problems in New Zealand and describe chemical processes used to treat water for drinking purposes
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  • Describe the basic chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere and discuss contemporary air quality issues including ozone depletion
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  • Describe climate change and critically assess the chemical sustainability of potential solutions to address the cause and symptoms of climate change
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  • Describe the basic chemistry of biological systems including the role of nutrition and how medicines can impact biological systems
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  • Balance nuclear reactions and use nuclear decay half-lives to estimate the age of an object
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  • Practical skills:

    -Accurately weigh samples by difference

    -Prepare a solution of known concentration

    -Measure the pH of a solution using a pH meter

    -Prepare a buffer solution of a given pH

    -Determine the concentration of an unknown solution by titration

    -Dilute a stock solution using a series dilution scheme

    -Determine the concentration of an unknown solution using visible spectroscopy

    -Analyse and graph data using Excel

    -Analyse compounds using thin-layer chromatography

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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 40% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 40% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Midterm Test
8 Apr 2020
7:30 PM
15
2. Xorro Participation
5
  • In Class: In Lecture
3. Practical Examination (20-24 May)
30
  • Hand-in: In Lab
4. Weekly Laboratory Tests
10
  • Hand-in: In Lab
5. Exam
40
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Recommended Readings

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CHEM2: Chemistry in Your World, John L. Hogg. ISBN: 978-1-133-96298-4
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Online Support

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This paper has a Moodle page (http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz) where you will be able to access pdfs of lecture notes and powerpoints, lecture recordings, and assessment materials. There are also discussion forums where you can both ask and answer questions.

Lectures will also be recorded using Panopto and will be available to view online.

PLEASE NOTE: Moodle will be used for class notices etc and it is your responsibility to check the site regularly. Instructions provided on Moodle and in lectures are considered to be given to the class as a whole.

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Workload

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The total workload expected for this paper is 150 hours. There are 33 hours of contact time scheduled for lectures and a further 60 hours available for drop-in tutorials. Students are required to complete 30 hours of laboratory work. The remaining hours are to be managed by the student to complete the weekly homework and to study for the test and final exam.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: CHEM100

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