CHEMY102-20B (HAM)

Chemical Reactivity

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science
Chemistry and Applied Physics

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: cheryl.ward@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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A theoretical and practical course covering aspects of physical and organic chemistry. This course is required for the chemistry major.

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Paper Structure

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OPERATION OF CHEMY102-20B –PLEASE READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY

  • Each week you will watch three recorded lectures and use these to complete the notes in your workbook. In the detailed timetable further on in this paper outline, you will find hyperlinks to the relevant lectures each week. This timetable is also reproduced on the Moodle page. You should view these lectures each week before attending a workshop. Printed workbooks can be obtained from Waikato Print https://www.waikato-print.co.nz/students/ or download and print the workbooks from Moodle.
  • Each week you must undertake ONE workshop run by either Michael (Paper weeks 1-6) or Merilyn (Paper weeks 9-14); these workshops will occur in L.G. 03 on Wednesdays 1100-1200 and Fridays 1200-1300 unless a change is notified. For those unable to attend a workshop in person, an additional workshop will be held on the Monday of the following week 1000-1100 by Zoom; the Zoom link is given in the Moodle page. The content of all workshops will be broadly similar and will cover the material in the three relevant lectures for that week. Small differences may occur due to student questions.

ATTENDANCE AT WORKSHOPS CARRIES 8% OF YOUR TOTAL GRADE.

ATTENDANCE AT WORKSHOPS WILL BE MONITORED BY CALLING A ROLL EACH WEEK.

If you have a question about the lecture material that you would like answered during the workshop you may ask in person at the workshop or Email Martina or the lecturer concerned beforehand.

  • In addition to the workshops, there will also be drop in tutorials held by Martina for assistance, if you require it. The times and rooms for these are given in the paper outline.
  • Each week you must attend a laboratory class and complete the relevant laboratory report. More detail of how the laboratory classes will be run and the equipment that you require, can be found in the paper outline.
  • Laboratory classes start in the first week of the Trimester. A roll is taken during the laboratory class and part of your laboratory mark includes a grade for attendance, preparation, promptness and careful and tidy work; the remainder of the grade is for the written calculation sheet or report.

ATTENDANCE AT LABORATORY CLASSES IS AN ESSENTIAL PART OF YOUR LEARNING

  • For unavoidable absences from laboratory classes or workshops, application for special consideration can be made using the forms available on Moodle.
  • If you are unable to attend your regular laboratory class, because of illness or other unavoidable circumstance, you should consult your tutor, Martina Pietsch Brown; normally it will be possible for you to attend one of the other laboratory sessions later that week.

PLEASE NOTE THAT IN THE EVENT OF ANY GOVERNMENT IMPOSED LOCKDOWN ALL WORKSHOPS AND LABORATORY CLASSES WILL CONTINUE ONLINE VIA ZOOM.


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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • The ability to describe basic thermodynamic concepts based on energy and entropy in addition to discuss the 1st, 2nd and 3rd laws of thermodynamics and the mathematical equations associated with these laws.
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  • The ability to discuss experimental processes used to obtain thermodynamic data and make predictions of thermochemical quantities of energy and entropy as well as of direction and extent of reactions.
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  • The ability to discuss the basic factors affecting a chemical reaction such as concentration, surface area, presence of a catalyst and temperature as well as how such data may be acquired.
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  • The ability to discuss the quantifiable aspects of kinetics measurements such as reaction rate, reaction order, rate constant, half-life and Arrhenius pre-exponential factors and become acquainted with the mathematical expressions describing them.
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  • The ability to discuss theoretical concepts associated with kinetics such as collision theory, activation energy and the activated complex as well as various mechanism types and how homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis cause faster reaction rates.
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  • The ability to discuss basic aspects of Electrochemistry including the construction of cells, balancing of equations, definitions of half-cell oxidation/reduction and overall cell reactions.
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  • The ability to discuss electrode potentials the use of the Nernst equation to describe a reversible cell as well as industrial applications of electrochemistry.
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  • The ability to describe the structure of organic molecules including bonding, configuration and conformation.
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  • The ability to name alkenes using E,Z nomenclature, assign absolute configuration and define a molecule as R or S and recognise examples of the various forms of configurational and stereoisomers.
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  • The ability to discuss the oxidation and reduction of functional groups.
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  • The ability to describe the formation and stabilisation of carbocation intermediates and mechanisms of electrophilic addition to alkenes, nucleophilic substitution of haloalkanes and alcohols and electrophilic aromatic monosubstitution of benzene.
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  • The ability to apply one of the mechanisms described above to novel situations and predict the products of reaction.
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  • The ability to work safely in the laboratory and to observe appropriate laboratory practices.
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  • Be able to carry out basic isobaric calorimetry experiments to learn about heat capacities and measurement of q and hence ∆H in a simple chemical reaction.
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  • Be able to study the kinetics of different reactions and to use this information to derive rate laws and activation energy of the chemical reaction being studied.
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  • Be able to carry out simple organic syntheses using techniques such as reflux, distillation, vacuum filtration, crystallisation, measurement of melting points and will be able to calculate theoretical and actual percentage yields.
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  • The ability to write a correctly formatted and illustrated report using appropriate scientific language and employing appropriate software
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Attendance at workshops
8
2. Weekly lab assessments (11)
28
  • Hand-in: In Lab
3. Test 1
20 Aug 2020
12:00 AM
14
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Test 2
1 Oct 2020
12:00 AM
7
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Test 3
17 Oct 2020
12:00 AM
7
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Final Test
36
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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There are no required readings.
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Recommended Readings

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For first year physical chemistry the recommended text book is Brown, LeMay, Bursten, Langford, Sagaty, “Chemistry the Central Science, a Broad Perspective”, either 1st or 2nd Editions.

For all organic chemistry courses (CHEMY102, 201 and 301) there is only one text recommended, which is Brown, Iverson, Anslyn, Foote: Organic Chemistry, 7th or 8th edition published by Cengage.

If you have problems with electron diagrams and keeping track of electrons in organic chemistry mechanisms, we strongly recommend the book “Pushing Electrons: A guide for Students of Organic Chemistry” by Weeks & Winter published by Cengage

For all Cengage purchases you receive a discount for purchase through the website using the discount code NZ15OFF

The library has many books useful to first year students, offering different viewpoints on topics discussed in lectures; some of these books are available online.

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Other Resources

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1. Mathematics skills

For those students who require additional help with mathematical skills required for the study of physical chemistry at this level, Student Learning are able to provide assistance. Please see the Moodle page for the latest information or see http://www.waikato.ac.nz/students/student-learning/

2. Study skills

Student Learning is able to provide assistance in this area. See http://www.waikato.ac.nz/students/student-learning/

3. Support for Maori/Pasifika students

The Faculty is also able to provide additional support to these students; again see the Moodle page for the latest information.

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Online Support

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This course uses Moodle, which is the online teaching and learning platform of the University of Waikato. In here, you will find a lot of helpful tools and features, such as lecture and lab material, answers to problem sets or exam papers as well as a number of communication tools. You should regularly check this site for announcements and messages.

To access Moodle go to http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz/ or click the ‘Moodle’ Link from the Quick Links section in the Waikato Current Students webpage. Log in using your Waikato username and password.

All lectures are recorded on Panopto and are available through Moodle.


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Workload

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150 hours total. 8 hours per week comprised of watching recorded lectures to complete workbooks, attending laboratory classes and workshops; the remainder for homework, revision and laboratory reports.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper provides the background necessary for a study of chemistry at higher levels, including papers required as part of a major in Chemistry or in Biochemistry or certain disciplines within Engineering.


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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: CHEM100 or CHEMY100, or a minimum A- grade in FOUND010, or 12 credits in NCEA chemistry at level 3, or by discretion of the Paper Co-ordinator.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: CHEM102 or CHEM112

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