CHEMY204-19A (HAM)

Analytical Chemistry

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science

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: cheryl.ward@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper covers aspects of analytical chemistry including characterisation using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass-spectrometry (MS); qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures using gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

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Paper Structure

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This paper consists of lectures on four commonly used analytical techniques and a laboratory course which gives students a chance to understand practical aspects of the techniques covered.

Important note for international students: For international students in New Zealand under student visas, regular attendance is part of your visa obligation and is checked as a requirement on the University under the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students, to which the University is a signatory. Academic staff are formally required to monitor attendance in classes and submission of compulsory assessment events/items and to report to Waikato International in the event that any problem with irregular attendance or non-submission is not resolved.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • interpret 1-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectra of simple organic molecules in terms of chemical shift, multiplicity and signal intensity.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • describe different parameters that affect the outcome of GC and HPLC analyses, including a range of different detectors and stationary phases.
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  • analyse chromatograms from GC and HPLC and to comment on the performance of the respective chromatography and suggest methods by which it might be improved.
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  • suggest a reasonably detailed method for analysis by chromatography of a specified mixture.
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  • describe and be able to select the appropriate methods of mass spectrometry for analysis of types of compounds.
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  • interpret and predict mass spectra of ions, including using isotope patterns and high resolution mass spectrometry.
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  • use planar or column benchtop chromatography to separate and identify two or more components of a mixture.
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  • interpret GC and HPLC chromatograms and use them to quantify components of a mixture.
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  • select appropriate conditions and carry out a quantitative 13C NMR experiment.
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  • have a working familiarity with analytical instrumentation such as NMR, LCMS, GC and HPLC instrumentation.
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  • write concise and clear laboratory reports with coherent discussion supported by appropriate referencing and using appropriate language and formatting.
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Assessment

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Assignment

Assignment 1 on HPLC

Assignment 2 on mass spectrometry

Test 1

Test 1 will be a 50-minute test that will cover NMR spectroscopy and Gas chromatography (GC)

Laboratory Report (1)

Report on Experiment 1

A hard copy of the report should be submitted at FG link (Faculty reception) on the week anniversary of when you did the lab session.

Laboratory Report (2)

Report on Experiment 2

A hard copy of the report should be submitted at FG link (Faculty reception) on the week anniversary of when you did the lab session.

Laboratory Reports (3-5)

Reports on Experiments 3-5

A hard copy of each report should be submitted at FG link (Faculty reception) on the week anniversary of when you did the lab session.

Laboratory performance (6 sessions)

Performance in the laboratory (5%) - preparedness, care in bench work, compliance with Health & Safety regulations, accuracy of data acquisition. A detailed grading sheet will be posted on Moodle outlining the points that will be assessed.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 50% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 50% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Laboratory Report 1
4
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
2. Laboratory Report 2
4
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
3. HPLC Assignment
25 Mar 2019
4:30 PM
7
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
4. Mass Spectrometry Assignment
6 May 2019
4:30 PM
6
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
5. Test 1 (Covers NMR spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography)
29 May 2019
2:00 PM
12
6. Laboratory performance
5
7. Laboratory Reports 3-5
12
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
8. Exam
50
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Analytical chemistry

  • For analytical chemistry we recommend: Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, by Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch (9th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning) which is the text for all levels 1, 2 and 3 of analytical chemistry. If you are not intending to study chemistry for 3 years it is possible to purchase an e-edition which will remain current for two years or to purchase individual chapters. These can be found at:

http://www.cengagebrain.co.nz/shop/en/NZ/storefront/newzealand?cmd=CLHeaderSearch&fieldValue=skoog

Copies of the book are available in the Library at QD75.2 .S55 2004

  • For assistance with spectral interpretation we recommend Silverstein, Webster, Kiemle & Bryce: Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds; 8th edition. Wiley. There are a number of earlier editions of this book in the library all with Silverstein as the lead author but with various other authors; note that the more recent editions will refer to more modern techniques.

Other suggested readings:

Practical Skills in Chemistry, second Edition, J. R. Dean et al, Prentice Hall, 2001 is a very useful resource; several copies are available in the Library. This book contains material on general skills (study and examination skills, IT and library resources, communicating information and presenting data), together with information directly relevant to the paper (writing essays, reporting practical work, writing literature reviews. It also contains information on essential practical skills in chemistry (recrystallisation, reflux, evaporation, infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry). QD33.2 .P73 2011

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Online Support

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This paper has a Moodle page (http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz) where you will be able to access lecture material, problem sets with answers etc. There are also discussion forums where you can both ask and answer questions. All lectures are recorded via Panopto and are available through Moodle.

PLEASE NOTE: Moodle will be used for class notices etc and it is your responsibility to regularly check the site and your appropriate e-mail account. Instructions provided on Moodle and during lectures are considered to be given to the class as a whole.


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Workload

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Total: 150 hours Formal contact hours: 24 Lectures (@50 minutes), 18 hours of laboratory work plus a maximum of 12 tutorials (@ 50 minutes). Personal study: 3 hours per lecture minimum during the semester for reviewing material and undertaking problems or assignments; 5 laboratory reports at 8 hours per report including report writing and analysis of spectra.


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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper is required for a major in chemistry and for BSc (Hons) in chemistry.

PREREQUISITE(S) CHEM101 or CHEMY111

EQUIVALENT(S) CHEM211 and CHEM213 combined.

RESTRICTION(S) CHEM204, CHEM211, CHEM213,


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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: CHEMY101 or CHEM111

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: CHEM204, CHEM211, CHEM213

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