COMPX241-22A (HAM)

Software Engineering Design 1

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences
Department of Computer Science

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: maria.admiraal@waikato.ac.nz
: buddhika.subasinghe@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This paper covers object-oriented software development in Java focusing on abstract data types and dynamic data structures, while introducing design methodologies in software construction, software process, and software testing. A group project reinforces broader software engineering practices. The paper assumes familiarity with basic object-oriented programming as introduced within COMPX101 and COMPX102 (COMP103 and COMP104 prior to 2017). Students in particular learn about commonly used data structures, including sets, lists, stacks, queues, trees, and hash-tables.

The learning outcomes for this paper are linked to Washington Accord graduate attributes WA1-WA11. Explanation of the graduate attributes can be found at: https://www.ieagreements.org/

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Paper Structure

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Course material is presented through three lectures each week, and an additional tutorial session is available once a week for students to get extra help. There is also a weekly class meeting for group project idea development (in the first instance) transitioning to teams providing weekly updates to the rest of the class later in the course, once the projects have been launched.

Assessment is through: two programming assignments; two tests; and a presentation, as well as an individual and team report on the group project. The tests are administered in-class; the first at roughly mid-trimester and the second in place of the last lecture of the trimester. The project presentations occur in study week.

Please note, in 2022, in-person lectures and tests may be substituted with online learning dependent on the current Covid19 situation.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Comprehend the computing fundamentals of abstract data types, data structures, algorithmic operations on them and understand issues pertaining to their computational complexity (WA1 and WA5)..
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Tutorial Exercises (1)
    Assignment 1 (2)
    Assignment 2 (3)
    Test 1 (4)
    Test 2 (5)
  • Comprehend methodologies to effectively construct, test and manage the software process while producing reusable, understandable and well-documented software artefacts (WA3 and WA5).
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Group Project: Presentation (6)
    Group Project: Individual Report (7)
    Group Project: Team Report (8)
  • Develop and test dynamic data structures and use existing data structure libraries to solve more complex problems (WA3).
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Tutorial Exercises (1)
    Assignment 1 (2)
    Assignment 2 (3)
    Test 1 (4)
    Test 2 (5)
  • Use software construction and testing tools to design and develop a software solution (WA2 and WA5).
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Group Project: Presentation (6)
    Group Project: Individual Report (7)
    Group Project: Team Report (8)
  • Work effectively and collaboratively within a software development team, and communicate technical problems and solutions to technical and non-technical audiences (WA9 and WA10).
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Group Project: Presentation (6)
    Group Project: Individual Report (7)
    Group Project: Team Report (8)
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Assessment

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Assessment items are as follows:

  • 2 Assignment, at 10% each
  • 10 tutorial exercises, at 1% each
  • 2 Tests, at 20% each
  • 1 Group Project (30% in total: 5% on presentation, 10% on group report, 15% individual report)

With the shared paper content between COMPX 241 and COMPX 201, there will in fact be four assignments run during the semester. A COMPX 241 student only needs to complete two of these, as the remaining internal assessment comes from the Group Project (exclusive to COMPX 241) and the two tests (again shared). In the situation where a COMPX 241 student complete more than 2 assignments (something that is encouraged to increase your learning), then the highest two scores will be used for this part of their internal assessment. Assessment of the Group Project is through an individual report, a group report, and a group presentation.

If you are enrolled in a BE(Hons), samples of your work may be required as part of the Engineering New Zealand accreditation process for BE(Hons) degrees. Any samples taken will have the student name and ID redacted. If you do not want samples of your work collected then please email the engineering administrator, Natalie Shaw (natalie.shaw@waikato.ac.nz), to opt out.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Tutorial Exercises
10
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
2. Assignment 1
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assignment 2
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Test 1
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
5. Test 2
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
6. Group Project: Presentation
5
  • Presentation: In Class
7. Group Project: Individual Report
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Group Project: Team Report
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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No required reading, but students are encouraged to seek supporting material as per the recommended reading given below.
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Recommended Readings

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Just about any textbook or online resource covering data structures using Java will be helpful.

The following textbook was previously required for this course, and is now highly recommended:

Data Structures & Problem Solving Using Java (4th Ed.), Mark Allen Weiss, Pearson Education (Addison-Wesley) 2010.

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Online Support

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The course Moodle page will provide supporting information.
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Workload

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This is a fifteen point course, and the expected workload for the semester is 150 hours accordingly. The lion's share of this will be through working on the assignments and the group project.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: COMPX102

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: COMPX201

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