DSIGN125-21A (HAM)

Introduction to Communication Design Production

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences
Department of Computer Science

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: maria.admiraal@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This paper enables students to perform basic computing operations and to operate software packages for the manipulation of visual images and text for use in print and screen-based applications.
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Paper Structure

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This is primarily a practical paper intended to equip students with the skills necessary to operate computer systems to produce designed graphics for screen and print. Theoretical background will be provided through lectures and weekly exercises. Students will practice computing skills with software tutorials and related exercises in two 2-hour per week labs. The labs include a compulsory critique component to assist in correct development of the projects and encourage creative thinking.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • demonstrate the following skills
    • use Adobe Indesign application software to design and produce page layouts
    • use Adobe Illustrator application software to design and produce illustrations
    • use Adobe Photoshop application software to edit bitmap images
    • use photographic equipment to capture images for production
    • apply the software tools to generate suitable images (including vector and raster images) for print and web based applications
    • create and layout documents and generate print or interactive PDFs from those documents
    • utilise a design process to determine requirements and generate suitable solutions
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Practical exercises
3 Jun 2021
No set time
15
  • In Class: In Lab
2. Critiques (10 sessions)
3 Jun 2021
No set time
15
  • Presentation: In Lab
3. Practical Test 1
6 May 2021
No set time
15
  • In Class: In Lab
4. Practical Test 2
3 Jun 2021
No set time
15
  • Hand-in: In Lab
5. Project 1, Mid Semester Project (Illustrator)
14 May 2021
4:00 PM
20
  • Hand-in: In Lab
6. Project 2, Final Project (Photoshop)
11 Jun 2021
4:00 PM
20
  • Hand-in: In Lab
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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The paper has a companion laboratory manual available in print from Waikato Print and online via Moodle. Students are recommended to purchase a printed copy of the manual for ease of reference during the laboratory classes. Ensure that you bring the laboratory manual to all classes.
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Recommended Readings

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The following works are not required for this course, however, they represent a mix of practical guidance and theoretical background on the practice of design which may benefit those seeking further detail on the subject.

Lupton, E., & Phillips, J. C. (2015). Graphic design: the new basics

Poulin, R. (2011). The language of graphic design: An illustrated handbook for understanding fundamental design principles

Lupton, E. Thinking with Type (2010)

Wallschlaeger, C., & Busic-Snyder, C. (1992). Basic Visual Concepts and Principles for Artists, Architects and Designers. McGraw Hill.

Chase, M., Hughes, R., Miriello, R., & White, A. W. (2008). Really Good Logos Explained: Top Design Professionals Critique 500 Logos and Explain What Makes Them Work. Rockport Publishers.

Paton, B., & Dorst, K. (2011). Briefing and reframing: A situated practice. Design Studies, 32(6), 573–587.

Cornish, K., Goodman-Deane, J., Ruggeri, K., & Clarkson, P. J. (2015). Visual accessibility in graphic design: A client–designer communication failure. Design Studies, 40, 176–195. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.destud.2015.07.003

Bennett, A. (2012). GOOD DESIGN is GOOD SOCIAL CHANGE: ENVISIONING AN AGE OF ACCOUNTABILITY IN COMMUNICATION DESIGN EDUCATION. Visible Language, 46(1), 66–79.

Felici, J. (2012). The complete manual of typography : a guide to setting perfect type (2nd ed..). Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press.

And finally, something a bit subversive…
Potts, S. (2014). A Refutation of The Elements of Typographic Style – and also something of a backdoor defense of creative freedom. Retrieved February 5, 2019, from https://medium.com/re-form/a-refutation-of-the-elements-of-typographic-style-3b18c07977f3

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Other Resources

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Recommended videos are noted in the Laboratory manual. Further recommendations will be made via Moodle.
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Online Support

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Students should be checking Moodle on a regular basis (at least twice a week). Announcements will be made weekly, lecture notes posted, and materials made available via the DSIGN125 Moodle page.. Student queries can be posted via the Moodle forums.

Alternatively, you can email the tutor. All email should have the paper number (DSIGN125) in the subject line. Email will be answered within one business day.

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Workload

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DSIGN125 is a 15 point course. Students should expect to spend at least 150 total study hours on this course. Therefore students can expect to spend approximately 10-12 hours per week working on this course.

Lecture 1 hour

Supervised Laboratories 4 hours

Unsupervised Laboratory work 3-4 hours

Preparation /Review remainder

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: COMP125

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