EARTH313-19A (HAM)

Engineering Geology

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science

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: cheryl.ward@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper introduces students to the basic concepts of engineering geology. Landslide processes, geomorphology and hazards are considered. The nature and means of development of strength in soils and rocks are discussed. Field and laboratory work gives students the opportunity to learn practical skills and apply the knowledge gained in lectures.
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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions and practical exercises. The first part of the paper concentrates on landslide processes and their characteristic geomorphology. The paper then considers engineering soil materials, addressing basic soil mechanics and methods for measuring soil strength in the field and laboratory. Limit equilibrium stability analysis for slopes is considered using local examples from soil slopes. The later part of the paper deals with the strength of rock materials, considering both intact and mass strength and means of measuring or estimating rock strength. An introduction to site investigation methods is given during a one day field trip.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Describe geomorphic processes relevant to engineering, and infer process from geomorphic evidence.
    The ability to describe a variety of geomorphic processes relevant to engineering, and to infer processes from geomorphic evidence.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand and be able to apply basic soil and rock mechanics principles, including:
    1. cohesion, friction, Coulomb's Equation, pore water pressure, effective stress
    2. intact and mass strength and influence of discontinuities on rock strength
    3. standard field and laboratory test methods
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Collect, analyse and interpret field and laboratory data for site investigation purposes using appropriate terminology
    1. Prepare and present a geomorphic map of a landslide;
    2. Use field index tests and prepare stratigraphic sections and soil profiles using appropriate geomechanics terminology;
    3. Prepare a detailed written report presenting methods and results and discussing the implications of the findings.

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop a simple geological model for a site from field investigation
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Undertake a deterministic stability analysis for simple soil slopes and discuss the results in terms of the assumptions involved in the analysis and input data quality.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Communicate effectively through written reports
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessed work involves completing a series of laboratory reports that introduce basic soil mechanics laboratory techniques. Each report is expected to be 3–4 pages long, with original data, graphs and analysis, and an interpretation of the results presented. A field report is prepared and should include a geomorphic map, stratigraphic sections with descriptions, a slope stability analysis, and a discussion of the strength and weaknesses of the methods used. Further details of submission requirements are included on Moodle.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 50% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 50% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Test
20 May 2019
4:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Lecture
2. Moodle quiz
15 Mar 2019
No set time
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assessed lab. 1 report
12 Apr 2019
No set time
7.5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Assessed lab. 2 report
26 Apr 2019
No set time
7.5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Field Report
24 May 2019
No set time
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Exam
50
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Study guide material will be available on Moodle.
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Recommended Readings

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Selby M.J., 1993; Hillslope Materials and Processes. 2nd edition. Oxford University Press.
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Online Support

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Online support will be provided via Moodle, which is accessible to all students who are enrolled in the paper.
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Workload

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There are 20 lectures, 11 hours of full‐class tutorial sessions, 12 hours of assessed practical sessions, and 8 hours field work. A Moodle quiz should be able to be completed during class time. Two laboratory reports are expected to take approximately 5 hours of individual study each to complete. The field report is prepared during laboratory times and through individual study. It is expected that the field report will require approximately 20 hours of independent work to complete after the field trip. A 300‐level 15 point paper in any of the science subjects offered by the University of Waikato typically involves less than 60 hours of supervised study and it is assumed that up to 90 hours will be spent in private study by an ‘average’ student.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper may be used as a prerequisite for ERTH552.
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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: EARTH211 or ERTH221 or EARTH221. EARTH251 is recommended.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ERTH352, ENGCV231

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