EARTH341-19A (HAM)

Coastal Oceanography

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science

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: cheryl.ward@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
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    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This 15 point paper focuses on the physical oceanography of the coastal zone. Topics include estuarine circulation, wind driven currents on the shelf, longwaves, resonance, seiching, methodologies for quantifying processes and coastal responses; evaluation of design conditions for coastal engineering; and application of numerical models for simulating coastal processes. We focus on how the fundamental forces that drive water motion can be used to explain the types of waves and currents that occur in a range of different coastal environments. The report allows students to set this knowledge in the context of applied problems. This paper follows on from EARTH241 and is a useful paper for students intending to undertake a thesis project in an aspect of coastal marine science. Prerequisites are EARTH241 or EARTH231.
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Paper Structure

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The paper consists of formal lectures, a field trip and practical/tutorial sessions. All material is considered necessary to successfully complete the paper.


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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Identify and use examples to explain the (1) equations of motion (e.g. governing the continuity of momentum, mass, heat and salt), and (2) understand the significance of each term within the equations
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  • Understand and predict the response of the coastal ocean to variations in external forcing (e.g. such as wind, gravitational attraction of the sun/moon, freshwater flows.)
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  • Synthesise and critically evaluate evidence (scientific, cultural, social and economic) in order to provide defensible assessments of coastal issues.
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  • Use appropriate models (mathematical or conceptual) to predict the behaviour of coastal processes, and be able to assess the validity and relevance of the prediction for human activities at the coast.
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  • Analyse and synthesise data (measured or modelled) in order to detect and identify underlying coastal oceanographic processes
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  • Communicate ideas and knowledge in clearly written, grammatically and computationally correct, logical reports.
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Assessment

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There are two exercises and one project. The project is about Tauranga Harbour, and is divided into 2 sections: one in which you analyse, plot and interpret data; the other in which you write a short essay interpreting your results within the wider context of harbour issues. You can choose which issues you would like to focus on. There are also by weekly quizzes and a test.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 40% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 40% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Test
20 May 2019
9:00 AM
10
  • Hand-in: In Lab
2. Quizzes
6
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Exercise 1
14 Mar 2019
5:00 PM
8
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Exercise 2
16 May 2019
4:30 PM
8
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
5. Project: Part A
22 Apr 2019
5:00 PM
14
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Project Part B
27 May 2019
5:00 PM
14
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Exam
40
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Handout material

Lecture handouts and the lab manual will be available on Moodle on the Friday of the week before each lecture. Some notes are also available for purchase from Waikato Print at the beginning of the semester. Note that these purchased notes may be updated prior to the lecture, and new material may be provided on Moodle that is not included in these notes. These notes are not intended to be a complete collection of reference material for the course. You are expected to research the topics yourself.


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Recommended Readings

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Matthias Tomczak online book: Coastal and Estuarine Oceanography, https://www.mt-oceanography.info/ShelfCoast/index.html

Komar, P D, 1998, Beach processes and sedimentation, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 544 pp.

Kamphuis, J.W., 2000. Introduction to coastal engineering and management. Advanced series on ocean engineering, 16. World Scientific, Singapore, 437 pp.


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Online Support

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Online support will be provided via Moodle, which is accessible to all students who are enrolled in the paper.


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Workload

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There are 24 lectures, a 10-hour field trip, a three hour exam, one one-hour tests and 10 two-hour practical sessions. The exam will require 40 hours of revision, the test 10 hours of revision and the remaining time will be devoted to assignments and the project. A 300-level 15 point paper in any of the science subjects offered by the University of Waikato typically involves less than 60 hours of supervised study and it is assumed that up to 90 hours will be spent in private study by an ‘average’ student

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Linkages to other papers: EARTH241, EARTH231, EARTH342


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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: EARTH241 or ERTH242

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ERTH344

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