ECONS306-20B (HAM)

Economics and Strategic Interaction

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Management
School of Accounting, Finance and Economics

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: denise.martin@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: clive.wilkinson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction to strategic thinking and analysis through the basic techniques of game theory, and to illustrate the range of its applications to almost all fields of social science via a wide array of example applications. In addition to the introduction of game theoretic concepts, we will discuss experimental results for at least some of them to provide insights on when neoclassical models are empirically supported and when a behavioural game theoretic approach may be more applicable. This in turn will give the students exposure to experimental economics methods.

The development of game theory over the last 60 years is an important theme in social sciences and policy-oriented research. For example, it has proven extremely valuable for analyzing problems in economics and finance, in environmental issues, in business strategy, law, international relations, political science, etc. Since the Nobel Prize in 1996 awarded to Nash/Selten/Harsanyi, almost 50% of the Nobel Prize topics in economics employ elements of game theory.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

This paper is taught through a series of workshops in which we will work through the various game theoretic concepts via discussion and interaction in experiment demonstrations to provide first hand experiences of the concepts. These workshops will be conducted face to face, but also recorded for those students that aren't able to attend due to COVID-19 restrictions. Each week, one zoom question and answer session will be conducted (time TBA) which will be thought of as a virtual "office hour". I will also offer my standard office hour physically within the office.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • 1. Able to identify situations of strategic interaction.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 2. Develop a well-defined game from a situation of strategic interaction.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 3. Able to choose appropriate solution concepts to analyse and solve a wide variety of strategic interactions.
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content
This paper is 100% internally assessed. There is no final examination for this paper.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Test 1 (online)
21 Aug 2020
12:00 PM
33
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Test 2 (online)
16 Oct 2020
12:00 PM
33
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Project
23 Oct 2020
12:00 PM
24
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Problem Sets
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Link to the University of Waikato Reading List:

The sole required text for this course is:

Joel Watson, "Strategy, An Introduction to Game Theory" 2013 Norton.

Edit Required Readings Content

Other Resources

Edit Other Resources Content
Specify any other resources that students will benefit from accessing. You may like to include other learning resources such as online recordings etc.
Edit Other Resources Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
All course materials and information is available via Moodle.
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
This is a 15 point paper. The expected workload per point is 10 hours of work. Therefore, the expected total workload for the paper is 150 hours.
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content
Note any linkages to other papers where the linkage is of importance.
Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: ECON100 or ECON110 or ECONS101 or ECONS102

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ECON314, ECON414 and ECONS203

Edit Linkages Content