EDSOC202-20A (HAM)

Planning Learning Opportunities for Adults

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Education
Te Kura Toi Tangata School of Education

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: helen.findlay@waikato.ac.nz
: nia.sugiharto@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz
: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content
This paper initially introduces fundamental concepts of adult learning and then investigates adult learning theorists whose work is relevant to programme development. Two major approaches are taken to understand the dynamics of programme development: bottom-up and top-down. In relation to the bottom-up approach, some underlying concepts are scrutinized (e.g. andragogy; transformative learning; popular education). Beyond learning about conceptual frameworks, the paper looks at prevalent models of programme development (mostly from the USA, partly from NZ) and then outlines a sequential analysis of key steps in understanding the process of programme development. Much of this section approximates a top-down approach. Ultimately, students are encouraged to develop and apply their own approach to planning, implementation and evaluation of adult learning programmes. The paper will involve a blend of online and face-to-face learning activities.
Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

The paper will be taught using a blended learning approach, which means a combination of face-to-face and online learning. More details will be provided during the first lecture and in Moodle.

In the early part of the paper, we will set the platform for understanding the nature of adult learning/education, and how that might differ from childhood and adolescent learning/education. We focus on the key concepts associated with programme development, especially from a bottom-up approach (e.g. via popular education strategies). In the later part of the paper we move our attention towards using more technical aspects of programme development, in alignment with a top-down approach. The overall intent is for students to develop their own approach to developing programmes for adult learning, given the particular circumstances and social-cultural context in which planning, implementation and evaluation takes place.

Throughout the paper, guests from the local region who work in adult, community and vocational education are invited to attend our tutorial workshops to share their ways of developing adult learning programmes. The final assignment requires students to apply their understanding of the dynamics of programme development in a particular context of their choice.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • 1. Identify and critically discuss each of the key concepts studied in the paper.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of effective adult learning principles
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of dominant planning models (and what constitutes an appropriate model of planning for a specific context)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 4. Demonstrate the ways in which issues of social justice can be incorporated into adult education and training activities
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 5. Demonstrate a strong grasp of basic tenets of scholarship
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

The aims of the four assignments are to:

  • encourage your own reflection about the nature of adult learning;
  • stimulate thinking about factors which influence effective planning of learning opportunities;
  • familiarize you with key components of models of programme development for adult learners;
  • strengthen your use of library and internet search skills for credible academic literature;
  • identify processes required to produce a strong scholarly analysis.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Self-Reflection as an Adult Learner
20 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Bottom-up model Critical Essay
9 Apr 2020
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Top-down Model Critical Essay
15 May 2020
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Integrated Model Critical Essay
5 Jun 2020
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
Weekly recommended readings are made available via Moodle and through the Reading List. However, students are expected to familiarize themselves with recommended texts as well as those included in the reading list.
Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

The literature identified below is highly recommended together with readings from the official Reading List for this paper. The literature that follows is a useful starting point to complete assignments. You are expected to make extensive use of the University library databases, including journals, to supplement these readings.

Benseman, J., Findsen, B., & Scott, M. (Eds) (1996). The fourth sector: Adult and community education in Aotearoa New Zealand. Dunmore Press.

Caffarella, R.S. (2002). Planning programs for adult learners. (2nd ed.) Jossey Bass.

English, L. (Ed.) International encyclopedia of adult education. Palgrave Publishers.

Foley, G. (Ed.) (2004). Dimensions of adult learning. Allen & Unwin.

Merriam, S.B., Caffarella, R.S. & Baumgartner, L.M. (Eds.) (2007). Learning in adulthood: A comprehensive guide. (3rd ed.) Josey Bass.

Milana, M., Webb, S., Holford, J., Waller, W. & Jarvis, P. (Eds.) (2018). The Palgrave International Handbook on Adult and Lifelong Education and Training. Palgrave Macmillan.

Tight, M. (2002). Key concepts in adult education and training. (2nd ed.) Routledge.

Wilson, A.L. & Hayes, E.R. (Eds.) (2000). Handbook of adult and continuing education. Jossey Bass.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Other Resources

Edit Other Resources Content
In addition to the above recommended books, from time to time on Moodle there will be additional resources made available.
Edit Other Resources Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content

This paper is supported by an online Moodle site. Notices and lecture guides will be distributed through this site, and all written assignments must be submitted through the site. Each week the site will be updated with information about the week’s lectures and any supplementary readings. You should check the class Moodle site on a regular basis.

Online web address: http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz/ (https://www.waikato.ac.nz/library/) or you can click on the Moodle link on the university home page.

You can use the online web site for general questions, for giving feedback on how things are going, and for contacting your tutor. Any issues can be discussed with the paper convenor through the Private Conversation forum on the Moodle site.

Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
You are expected to participate in the lectures and tutorial activities each week. Overall, you should commit to 150 hours inclusive of reading and construction of assignments for this 15 point paper.
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content
This paper is good preparation for the third year paper EDSOC302: Adults learning for life. Other possibilities can be discussed with advisors for Education & Society, Postgraduate Leader the School of Education and the Programme Leader for Master of Education.
Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PCSS231

Edit Linkages Content