EDUCA557-20S (BLK)

Research Methods

30 Points

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Te Kura Toi Tangata Faculty of Education
Faculty of Education Dean's Office

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: helen.findlay@waikato.ac.nz
: janene.harris@waikato.ac.nz
: christine.stewart@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz
: hinerangi.kara@waikato.ac.nz
: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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Welcome to Research Methods in 2020! We are looking forward to working with you in this paper. Please feel free to contact Chris Eames as paper convenor if you wish to talk through ideas and issues.

The workshop sessions will give you background in key areas such as:

  1. The purpose of research as creating and validating new knowledge through peer review;
  2. The broad theoretical paradigms and frameworks through which education and social science research is viewed;
  3. Education and social science research ethics;
  4. Ensuring quality (validity, reliability, trustworthiness etc.) in education and social science research;
  5. Methods for generating data (e.g., interviews, observations, surveys), forms of data analysis and what counts as evidence;
  6. Multiple approaches to research (e.g., case studies, narratives, action-research) and associated forms of data analysis.
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Paper Structure

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Two weeks of face to face classes are held from Monday, 6 January to Friday, 10 January 2020 and Monday, 13 January to Friday, 17 January 2020. They are scheduled to begin at 9.00am and conclude at approximately 12.30pm with a tea break around 10.45am. Classes will be held in room TT1.05. After 17 January, independent study supported by our online platform, Moodle, will continue.

It is expected that students will undertake independent reading, study and other assigned course-related work each afternoon during the on-campus weeks, and at other times outside of timetabled class hours.

The full duration of the course is Monday, 6 January – 21 February 2020.

The following provides an overview of topics to be covered during the on-campus component of this course. They will be completed using a blend of workshops, professional discussion of literature, student, lecturer and guest presentations, and personal and whole group reading, review and critique. Please note the designated days are indicative and will depend upon progress.

Week 1: Concepts in Education and Social Science Research

1. The nature and characteristics of education research: Being a researcher (Monday, 6 January, with Chris and Bronwen)

  • Introduction to the paper (outline, readings, assignments, Moodle support site)
  • What is education research?
  • The purpose of education research
  • What does it mean to be an education researcher?
  • Using library resources and databases (Alistair/Mel)

2. The research process (Tuesday, 7 January, with Chris and Bronwen)

  • Understanding the world through research: Ontology, epistemology, methodology and axiology
  • Ways of seeing the world through research: some common research paradigms and how they inform different research designs
  • An introduction to research ethics (issues and requirements)

3. Undertaking research from a Māori perspective and research ethics (Wednesday, 8 January, with Bronwen and guests)

  • Historical Māori experiences with, and perceptions about research
  • Māori values and expectations around ethics
  • Māori cultural values and practices
  • The nature of Māori knowledge
  • Research ethics (debate preparation)

4. The ethics debate and developing research questions (Thursday, 9 January, with Bronwen)

  • The ethics debate
  • Developing a research question
  • An afternoon session 1.30-3pm will be offered for literature searching skills (highly recommended)

5. Reviewing literature (Friday, 10 January, with Bronwen and Monica Payne)

  • What is a literature review?
  • What are the purposes of a literature review?
  • Synthesis and critique in generating a quality review
  • Structuring and writing a quality review

Week 2: Gathering and analysing data

6. Research approaches (Monday, 13 January, with Chris)

  • Exploring a range of research approaches and their strengths and limitations

7. Data gathering methods (Tuesday, 14 January, with Chris)

  • Types of data - quantitative and qualitative
  • Exploring a range of data gathering methods
  • An afternoon session 1.30-3pm will be offered for EndNote skills (highly recommended)

8. Quantitative data analysis techniques (Wednesday, 15 January, with Chris)

  • Interpreting quantitative data
  • Introduction to basic statistical concepts (eg., std. deviation, confidence intervals, effect size, statistical significance)
  • Using common software packages for statistical analysis (eg., Excel)
  • Measures of research quality (validity, reliability)

9. Qualitative data analysis techniques (Thursday, 16 January, with Chris and Bronwen)

  • Analysing qualitative data through coding (manual and NVivo), discussing and presenting evidence
  • Measures of research quality (trustworthiness)

10. Planning your research (Friday, 17 January, with Chris and Bronwen)

  • The process of peer review
  • Crafting research questions
  • Planning your research and preparing your proposal
  • Discussing research ideas
  • Shared lunch
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • 1. Understand processes, procedures and ethical requirements for undertaking education and social science research;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 2. Become familiar with a base of literature on education and social science research;
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  • 3. Describe, explain, critique and plan within the field of education and social science research, that is, to develop ‘research literacy’
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  • 4. Locate research findings and explanations of others in peer-reviewed articles, and to use these effectively for personal research;
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  • 5. Further develop skills for formal academic writing (e.g., critical review, using citations, quotes, references etc.) and constructing arguments in the field of education research;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 6. Use APA referencing (v.6) style correctly
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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In order to be eligible for a pass in this course students are required to complete all three pieces of assessment.

General assessment criteria are included below. However, assessment rubrics specific to each assessment task will be made available on the Moodle support site.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment 1
20 Jan 2020
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment 2
2 Feb 2020
11:30 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assignment 3
16 Feb 2020
11:30 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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All readings for this course are managed by the university’s online Reading List Talis Aspire system. This means you will not need to purchase a readings book for this course.

NB: It is expected that participants will make substantial use of online databases and other digital and non-digital sources in researching widely for assignments and tasks. The readings for the course accessed via Talis Aspire represent a baseline level of literature only.

Students will be introduced to the Moodle support site and the Talis Aspire system while on-campus. Please refer to this site regularly for course support and information.


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Recommended Readings

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It is recommended course participants purchase one of the following texts to supplement their work in this course, and to support future thesis or dissertation planning and writing.

Cohen, L. & Manion, L. (2018). Research methods in education (8th ed. update). New York, NY: Routledge[1].

Menter, I., Elliot, D., Hulme, M., Lewin, J., & Lowden, K. (2012). A guide to practitioner research in education. London, England: Sage.

Mutch, C. (2013). Doing educational research: A practitioner's guide to getting started. (2nd ed.). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.

Contact:Bennetts University Book Centre, PO Box 13 066, Hamilton.

Email: wku@bennetts.co.nz; Ph: (07) 856 6813; Fax: (07) 856 2255.


[1] Earlier editions of this text are readily available second hand and are appropriate for this course. This text is recommended for those considering 3 or 4 paper Masters thesis pathways.
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Other Resources

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There are many texts in the central library for use for assignments. Here are some examples:

Bell, J. (2005). Doing your research project (5th ed.). Buckingham, England: Open University Press.

Burns, R. (2000). Introduction to research methods (2nd ed.). Melbourne, Vic., Australia: Longman.

Creswell, J. W. & Poth, C.N. (2018). Qualitative inquiry and research design. Choosing among five approaches. London, UK: Sage Publications Inc.

Maykut, P., & Morehouse, R. (2001). Beginning qualitative research: A philosophic and practical guide (2nd ed.). London, England: Routledge.

Tolich, M., & Davidson, C. (2011). (Eds.). Getting started: An introduction to research methods. Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson Publications.

The University also now subscribes to SAGE Research Methods which has many resources here - https://methods-sagepub-com.ezproxy.waikato.ac.nz/

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Online Support

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Students will be introduced to the Moodle support site while on-campus. Please refer to this site regularly for course support and information.
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Workload

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Classes are scheduled to begin at 9am and will conclude at approximately 12.30pm. Classes will be held in room TT1.05 with other spaces as breakout rooms. There will be a short break at approx. 10.45am each day. However, it is expected that students will undertake independent reading, study and other assigned course-related work each afternoon during the on-campus week, and at other times outside of timetabled class hours.
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