ENGLI301-20B (HAM)

Genre Studies: Challenging Forms

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Arts
English

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: alexandra.cullen@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

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: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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Comic forms are always with us. Comedies make us laugh, and sometimes cry. They teach us how to live (or not to live) in groups. In comedies men and women frequently behave extremely badly, provoking both amusement and ridicule. In this paper we will examine comedies from four centuries, ranging from Medieval comedy and Shakespeare to sitcoms and contemporary films. We will explore a variety of comedic forms, focusing, in particular, on: comedy and the body; nonsense and absurdity; wit and word play; satire and social critique; writing comedy; comedy and pain; and comedy on the edge.
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Paper Structure

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ENGLI301-20B Genre Studies: Challenging Forms is a paper in which the classes have a strong interactive element, with students learning through a combination of knowledge transmission, discussion, and immersive activities. In 2020 this paper will be taught using multiple learning platforms to enable both students who are on campus and students who are learning online to participate and engage.

Lectures will be taught face-to-face. Students not able to be on campus will be able to attend the lectures via zoom. All lectures will also be recorded on panopto and available for students to view at a time of their choosing.

The workshops for this paper will be face-to-face. There will also be an online zoom workshop option for those not able to be on campus.

Students' learning will be supported by online Moodle learning platforms, such as lessons and discussion forums, and all written assessment will be submitted through Moodle. The Writing Participation and Discussion Starter assessments will take place in the workshops, which have both face-to-face and online options as noted above.

All course information, digital versions of written texts, links to films studied, assessment information, lecture slides, and links to useful resources will be available through Moodle.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Understand and discuss comedy as a literary form
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  • Discuss and analyse a literary genre across multiple mediums (poetry, fiction, film, television, stand-up, memoir)
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  • Discuss and analyse comedic forms across different literary time periods, from Medieval comedy to contemporary texts
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  • Approach texts from critical perspectives
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  • Read critically, think analytically, write lucidly, and present material clearly and persuasively
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Assessment

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Students are expected to complete all assessment modules for the completion of this paper.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Lesson on Sitcom
21 Jul 2020
5:00 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Lesson on The Miller's Tale
28 Jul 2020
5:00 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Lesson on Jane Austen and Edward Lear
4 Aug 2020
5:00 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Lesson on The Importance of Being Earnest
11 Aug 2020
5:00 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Close Reading/Blog
17 Aug 2020
11:30 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Creative Writing
18 Sep 2020
11:30 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Research Essay
27 Oct 2020
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Discussion Starter
5
  • In Class: In Workshop
9. Workshop Participation
10
  • In Class: In Workshop
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

All other material will be available on the Reading List and in the Course Reader

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Recommended Readings

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A range of recommended reading and viewing will be available in the Reading List and on Moodle.
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Online Support

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There is an online Moodle community for this course. Moodle can be accessed via iWaikato. Lecture recordings will be available on Moodle and assignment details, important dates, a link to the reading list, the paper outline, and a range of resources are all available from this site.

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Workload

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The expected workload for this paper is 9 hours per week (3 hours of teaching and 6 hours of self-directed study) throughout the 17 week semester
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ENGL220, ENGL309

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