HISTY107-21A (HAM)

New Zealand Histories: Fresh Perspectives

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
History

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: monique.mulder@waikato.ac.nz

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: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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New Zealand Histories engages with the contested narratives in the making of Aotearoa. It explores the entangled and separate histories of early Māori and later Pākehā European and other migrants. Students are encouraged to unpack the concept of the New Zealand 'nation' and wrestle with the following questions:

  • Who owns the past in New Zealand history?
  • What strands weave together the varying stories of Aotearoa/New Zealand?
  • What are the main events, peoples, ideas and turning points in New Zealand history?
  • How should I write, think about, and teach New Zealand history now? How might I grapple with the tensions between Māori and Pākehā narratives in a history of colonisation?
  • Where are the narratives of marginalised groups in New Zealand historiography?

The main topics under investigation include: cultural encounters, migration and resettlement; conflict and negotiation; political and economic initiatives; social and political change, health, welfare, class, sport, and gender. These topics are explored for the ways in which they shed light on the themes of national identity, nationalism or nationhood, in New Zealand.

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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught via a series of weekly lectures focused on a chronological exploration of New Zealand history that serves to reveal various deeper themes and questions about the kinds of histories that have been produced in and about Aotearoa. These lectures are supplemented by weekly tutorials where students will be able to discuss the major themes and ideas in the course as they relate to their personal study and to specific assessments and themes in the paper.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Learn about patterns of cultural encounter and narrative construction in in Aotearoa/New Zealand history
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  • Understand the historical context for many issues of contemporary concern
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  • Explore historical ‘experiences’ through contemporary source materials and historical writing
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  • To develop your knowledge of New Zealand history by enabling you to read and critically evaluate secondary scholarly literature;
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Specific information about assessments will be communicated in lectures, tutorials, and via Moodle.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 50% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 50:50 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 50% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. A Timeline of NZ Historical Events
13 Apr 2021
4:30 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Research Essay
1 Jun 2021
4:30 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Final Exam
50
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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For all required reading materials, see Waikato Reading List for paper HISTY107-19A via the Library. A link to the reading list will also be available on Moodle.
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Recommended Readings

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James Belich, Making Peoples: A History of the New Zealanders from Polynesian Settlement to the End of the Nineteenth Century (Auckland: The Penguin Press, 1996).

James Belich, Paradise Reforged: A History of the New Zealanders from the 1880s to the Year 2000 (Auckland: Penguin Books, 2001).

Ranginui Walker, Ka Whawhai Tonu Matou: Struggle Without End, 2nd edn. (Auckland: Penguin, 2004).

The New Oxford History of New Zealand, ed. by Giselle Byrnes (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2009).

These texts are available from the University library and a copy of each have been placed in the 'High Demand Collection' (formerly known as Course Reserve). For further information, see: https://www.waikato.ac.nz/library/services/borrowing/course-reserve

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Online Support

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Availability to any online resources or support will be accessible through Moodle.
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Workload

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Normal class contact time is 24 hours of lectures over the twelve weeks of teaching during the semester, and an extra 11 hours of tutorials (35 hours in total class contact time). For a typical student in a 15 point paper (offered over one semester) the expected workload is approximately 10 hours per week, including class contact time. Excluding the three hours of lectures and one hour tutorial time, students should average at least six hours of time spent on study, reading, and/or assessment work per week. These figures are only approximations, as papers vary in their requirements, and students vary in both the amount of effort required and the level of grades they wish to achieve.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: HIST107

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