HPSCI303-20A (HAM)

Advanced Biomechanics in Sport: Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
Te Huataki Waiora - School of Health

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: courtney.kelly@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: cheryl.ward@waikato.ac.nz
: debby.dada@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
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Paper Description

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The paper critically examines the theoretical and biomechanical concepts involved in analysing and monitoring human movement to enhance health and performance outcomes, as well as to prevent and manage injuries. The paper will cover injury mechanisms, clinical assessment and diagnostics, biomechanics and performance, biomechanics and injuries, footwear science, rehabilitation / retraining, and clinical effectiveness of different treatment modalities. Running is an activity required in most sports and used for enhancing fitness. Running will be the main source of reference, with links to other sports highlighted throughout the paper.

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Paper Structure

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This paper includes one 2-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory session per week, except for the first week where no laboratory sessions will take place. Moodle will be the primary means used to share course material and communications regarding the paper.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Understand the role that adaptation and misadaptation play in injury incidence, prevention & rehabilitation
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand concepts of mechanical loading and apply principles for injury prevention & rehabilitation
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  • Apply biomechanical principles and concepts to human movement and sport
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  • Integrate new clinical and biomechanical assessment & rehabilitation methods in laboratory and field-based environments
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  • Develop critical thinking and reasoning surrounding common beliefs & practices in sports biomechanics & injuries
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Assessment

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This paper contains six (6) assessments. These include four Moodle Submissions and two In-Class Tests.

All assessments cover topics from both the lectures and the labs. Moodle Submissions will have a greater practical component.

Two Moodle Submssions are online quizzes. Two Moodle Submissions are practical assignments to be submitted online through Moodle.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Moodle Submission (1)
16 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Moodle Submission (2)
30 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. In-Class Test (1)
7 Apr 2020
12:00 PM
30
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Moodle Submission (3)
11 May 2020
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Moodle Submission (4)
25 May 2020
11:30 PM
10
6. In-Class Test (2)
2 Jun 2020
12:00 PM
30
  • In Class: In Lecture
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Recommended Readings

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Anderson, L. M., Bonanno, D. R., Hart, H. F., & Barton, C. J. (2019). What are the benefits and risks associated with changing foot strike pattern during running? A systematic review and meta-analysis of injury, running economy, and biomechanics. Sports Medicine. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01238-y

Barton, C.J., Managing RISK when treating the injured runner with running retraining, load management and exercise therapy. Phys Ther Sport. 2018;29: p. 79-83.

Barton, C.J., D.R. Bonanno, J. Carr, B.S. Neal, P. Malliaras, A. Franklyn-Miller, and H.B. Menz, Running retraining to treat lower limb injuries: A mixed-methods study of current evidence synthesised with expert opinion. Br J Sports Med, 2016. 50(9): p. 513-26.

Barnes, K.R. and A.E. Kilding, Running economy: Measurement, norms, and determining factors. Sports Medicine-Open, 2015. 1(1): p. 1-15.

Bramble, D.M. and D.E. Lieberman, Endurance running and the evolution of Homo. Nature, 2004. 432(7015): p. 345-352.

Esculier, J.F., B. Dubois, C.E. Dionne, J. Leblond, and J.S. Roy, A consensus definition and rating scale for minimalist shoes. J Foot Ankle Res, 2015. 8: p. 42.

Hall, J.L., C. Barton, P. Jones, and D. Morrissey, The biomechanical differences between barefoot and shod distance running: A systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis. Sports Med, 2013: p. 1-19.

Moore, I.S., Is there an economical running technique? A review of modifiable biomechanical factors affecting running economy. Sports Medicine, 2016.

Miller, J. R., Van Hooren, B., Bishop, C., Buckley, J. D., Willy, R. W., & Fuller, J. T. (2019). A systematic review and meta-analysis of crossover studies comparing physiological, perceptual and performance measures between treadmill and overground running. Sports Medicine. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01087-9

Newman, P., J. Witchalls, G. Waddington, and R. Adams, Risk factors associated with medial tibial stress syndrome in runners: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Open Access J Sports Med, 2013. 4: p. 229-41.

Pappas, E. and W.M. Wong-Tom, Prospective predictors of patellofemoral pain syndrome: A systematic review with meta-analysis. Sports Health, 2012. 4(2): p. 115-20.

Schubert, A.G., J. Kempf, and B.C. Heiderscheit, Influence of stride frequency and length on running mechanics: a systematic review. Sports Health, 2014. 6(3): p. 210-7.

Souza, R.B., An evidence-based videotaped running biomechanics analysis. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am, 2016. 27(1): p. 217-36.

Van Hooren, B., Fuller, J. T., Buckley, J. D., Miller, J. R., Sewell, K., Rao, G., . . . Willy, R. W. (2019). Is motorized treadmill running biomechanically comparable to overground running? A systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-over studies. Sports Medicine. doi:10.1007/s40279-019-01237-z

Warden, S.J., I.S. Davis, and M. Fredericson, Management and prevention of bone stress injuries in long-distance runners. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 2014. 44(10): p. 749-65.

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Other Resources

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The following video processing tools might be used in labs and for Moodle Submissions. Use of these tools will be taught in laboratory sessions.

Siliconcoach

Kiinovea

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Online Support

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Lecture notes will be made available on MOODLE following lectures. However, lecture notes are brief and do not include the detail required to complete this paper. Therefore it is to your advantage to attend ALL lectures to ensure you are conversant with the content of this paper.
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Workload

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This paper has an expectation of 150 hours (equates to 12.5 hours per week) of class time and independent study. While these 150 hours are a University wide requirement and reflect professional commitment, absences can create problems not only for your learning progress but also for your student colleagues. If you know in advance that you will be absent from a lecture or laboratory, then you must advise the lecturer.
There are 4 contact hours per week (2 hours lectures, 2 hours of laboratories); therefore, students should plan to spend around 8 hours each week on
readings, assignments, revisions, and independent study.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper expands on the paper content covered in HPSI101, SPLS104, and HPSCI204, and links to HPSCI301 and HPSCI304.
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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisites: HPSCI101 (or SPLS103 and SPLS104) and HPSCI204 (or SPLS204 and SPLS215).

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

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