LEGAL440-19B (HAM)

Special Topic: Pacific Peoples and the Law

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
Te Piringa - Faculty of Law
Faculty of Law Dean's Office

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: carolyne.taylor@waikato.ac.nz
: em.pooley@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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Pacific Peoples and the Law is the critical study and comparison of legal systems and issues within the Pacific region. This paper provides students with the opportunity to place law within a regional context and undertake research of regional importance. It also provides a legal context for historical developments, current socio-economic challenges, indigenous studies and doing business in the Pacific. In this paper students will be introduced to customary law, traditional legal systems and historical developments in the Pacific. They will also examine selected comparative case studies taken from both public and private law which explore contemporary challenges, paradoxes and opportunities.
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Paper Structure

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This is an B Semester paper. The teaching component comprises 12 two hour lectures. Each week students are required to attend one two-hour lecture per week.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate applied understanding of concepts and knowledge of traditional legal systems of the Pacific region;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of comparative law methodologies;
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  • Discuss and critically analyse public and private law issues of current importance within the Pacific region;
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  • Place New Zealand law within the wider context of Pacific law, history and society; and
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  • Produce a major piece of legal research and writing.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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The assessments for this paper have been designed to meet the learning outcomes. The more students engage with assessments, the better they will achieve the learning outcomes.

The bulk of the assessments are based around a research project. Students are encouraged to consider potential research topics and begin preliminary research early. Students are not limited to the topics we will cover in lectures. Neither will all topics be covered by the time the proposal is due. The topics covered in the paper have been chosen to give students a foundation and springboard for their own research. Students are encouraged to find a topic they are interested in regarding Pacific peoples and law.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Attendance, engagement and participation
10
  • In Class: In Lecture
2. Reading discussion forums
10
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
3. Research proposal
9 Aug 2019
12:00 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Research presentation
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Research paper
18 Oct 2019
12:00 PM
50
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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All law students are required to purchase, for use in all law papers, a copy of McLay, Murray & Orpin, New Zealand Law Style Guide (3rd ed), Thomson Reuters (2018). This is available from Bennetts, at an approximate price of $37.

There is no textbook or course materials book for this class. Required and recommended readings will be found in Moodle.

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Recommended Readings

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Students will be provided with a reading list for each week’s class. This reading list will indicate both required readings and recommended readings. Required readings provide a basic foundation and background for understanding topics. Recommended readings are designed to build upon that foundation and to complement or enhance learning in the classroom and the research and writing project. To achieve good marks, students are encouraged to read all required materials prior to lectures and to do their best to read recommended materials as well.
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Other Resources

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Further material may be provided on the paper site on Moodle (http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz), the University of Waikato’s online learning system. Any such material is provided on the following terms:

The University of Waikato owns the intellectual property rights, including copyright, in and to this site, or has acquired the necessary licenses to display the material on the site. As a student of the Te Piringa Faculty of Law, you are granted a limited license to use (access, display or print a single copy) the material from the papers in which you are enrolled for the purposes of participating in the paper only, provided the information is not modified. Materials may not under any circumstances be copied, stored, distributed or provided in any form or method whatsoever to any third party. Any other use of the material is prohibited. None of the material may be otherwise reproduced, reformatted, republished or re-disseminated in any manner or form without the prior written consent of the University of Waikato. To obtain such consent, please contact Te Piringa Faculty of Law.

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Online Support

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Online support for this paper is provided via Moodle.
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Workload

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Students should expect to spend 150 hours in total on this paper. In addition to lecture attendance, significant time will need to be spent on background and complementary reading. Students should allow for periods of more-focused research time in the preparation of assignments and/or presentations.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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There are clear linkages between this paper and all other papers with a focus on Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples, International Law and Public International Law, as well as Comparative Law. This law paper will also be of interest to students of the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies and the Faculty of Social Sciences among others.
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