LINGS201-20B (HAM)

Language Analysis

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Arts
General and Applied Linguistics

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: vanessa.mclean@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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Paper Description

In this paper, you will explore the phonological, morphological and morphosyntactic systems of languages by looking at data from a wide variety of languages. You will be introduced to general descriptive techniques of analysing linguistic data. This course has a strong practical orientation and you will complete practical tasks in language analysis through the course.

Paper Structure

The paper has three contact hours each week. These three hours will usually focus on a single topic of language analysis, drawing from the areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax as appropriate. The contact hours will explore the weekly topic via a formal introductory lecture and in-class workshop tasks. Key additional components are the required readings and take-home assessment which support and extend in-class learning.

However, this semester, because of adjustments we are currently making to having lectures online and tutorials in person (as much as possible), I will be loading videos for you on Moodle each week, which you will watch in your own time and then we will aim to meet once a week - during the Friday session - to discuss and practice the topics together. If you are unable to make the face-to-face Friday sessions, please let me know by email at the earliest convenience so I can make alternate arrangements for you (these will not disadvantage you in any way, but I do need to know your circumstances before the start of the course). Once the course begins, I will assume you can make the Friday session unless I am told (in writing) otherwise.

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Paper Structure

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This course has an associated Reading List. I will also use Moodle from time to time but the main point of contact will take place during lectures and tutorials so attendance of lectures cannot be underestimated.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • recognize the hierarchical nature of how discourse is formulated in a range of contexts
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • identify and classify major parts of the structure of (primarily) written texts (constituents, heads, modifiers, complements, adjuncts, clauses)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • analyse how tense is signalled in a portion of discourse, and be able to contrast the use of various tenses in a given text
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • evaluate how coherence and cohesion are signalled and maintained in a given text,
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • critically analyse passages of writing (their own or that of others) with respect to their adherence (or lack thereof) to the syntactic principles discussed, and cohesion and coherence.
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  • become aware of the goals and rationale of the field of syntax
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  • obtain sufficient background in order to facilitate the study of grammar at a higher level
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Please note that all assessments count toward the final grade and I recommend that students attempt all assessments. There is no final exam for this course.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment 1 - Phonological analysis
28 Aug 2020
5:00 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment 2 - Morphological analysis
23 Oct 2020
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Weekly exercises - 11 exercises worth 5% each
55
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Haspelmath, Martin & Andrea D. Sims. 2010. Understanding Morphology. 2nd edn. London: Hodder Education. Chapters 1 to 10.

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Recommended Readings

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Ashby, Patricia. 2011. Understanding Phonetics. London: Hodder Education.

Hayes, Bruce. 2009. Introductory Phonology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

For further information please see

Crowley, Terry., John Lynch, Jeff Siegel, Julie Piau. 1995. The Design of Language. Auckland: Longman Paul.
Finegan, Edward. 2008. Language: Its structure and use. Stamford, USA: Cengage Learning.
Fromkin, V. et al. 2012. An introduction to language. Australia and New Zealand 7th edn. Melbourne: Cengage Learning.
Fromkin, Victoria, Robert Rodman, Nina Hyams. 2009. An introduction to language. 10th edn. Boston, USA: Cengage Learning.

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Online Support

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The course has an associated Moodle website and all assessment will be handed in via this site.
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Workload

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This paper involves three contact hours per week, supported by reading and problem solving of up to 10 hours per week, with additional hours required for the preparation of formal assessment.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE ARE NO PREREQUISITE PAPERS TO THIS COURSE (counter to what is stated below).
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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: LING231

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