MAORI203-18A (HAM)

Decolonising Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples

15 Points

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: hinerangi.kara@waikato.ac.nz
: mahue.dewes@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This course is taught in two parts. Part One examines the history of research on Indigenous Peoples and the impact of that research on knowledge about Indigenous peoples, including Māori, The history of research is deeply connected to the history of European imperialism and colonialism. Many of the disciplines of the academy were formed and shaped by European experiences and their claims to 'discovery' of the lands and peoples of the "New World.' The second part of the course is about the resistance of Indigenous Peoples to representations of them/us that have led to stereotyping and denigration of peoples, their cultures, laguages and customs. This part of the course will address indigenous world views about knowledge and knowledge creation, explore issues about the ethics of researching with Indigenous Peoples and will then introduce you to some selected indigenous methodologies for research.
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Paper Structure

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The course is taught with a weekly lecture that will also incorporate group discussions and seminars and with resource back up using Moodle.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Content knowledge

    1. Critically engage with content knowledge about the ways in which research, imperialism and colonialism are implicated in the encounters with, representation, defining and colonization of Indigenous Peoples.

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Research ethics
    2. Demonstrate their understanding of, and discuss the issues related to research ethics in relation to Indigenous Peoples and other marginalised and vulnerable communities

    3. Recognise and explain what unethical research looks like and understand the reasons behind codes of ethics and ethical practices in research.

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Engagement with the work of Indigenous research experts
    4. Engage with the work of indigenous scholars who think and write about Indigenous knowledge, research approaches and methodologies and be able to incorporate and discuss their work in your own discussions and assignments.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Critical terminology
    5. Critically understand and apply terminology that is used widely in Indigenous Research. This includes terms such as representation, Kaupapa Māori, indigenous positioning, indigenous epistemology, ontology.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment is important to help you and the lecturer understand how you are grappling with the course material and to track how you are understanding and using the key ideas of the course. The assigments help consolidate your understandings by focussing your thinking and writing into a specific area of thinking. Take assignments seriously and do the background preparation well ahead of the due date of any assignment. The habit of handing in an assignment on time is the most important habit to acquire at this stage, The second most important habit is to demonstrate that you have prepared for the assignment by reading the relevant materials and showing that you have thought independently about the topic you are writing about or discussing. The third most important habit is to reference your work, the authors you have read, the people and resources that have helped you form your ideas, using the APA style that the Faculty recommends. These habits help ensure the integrity of your work and doing this should prevent any risk of plagiarising the work of others.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Essay
13 Apr 2018
12:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Research proposal and ethics application
14 May 2018
12:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. End of Course Test
28 May 2018
12:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Participation
1 Jun 2018
No set time
10
  • In Class: In Lecture
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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This course follows the format of Decolonizing Methodologies Research and Indigenous Peoples (2012). This publication is the key reader for this course. Students will be informed of required readings for each lecture through Moodle.

It is highly recommended that students purchase these books, they will also be available on course reserve at the library.

Hokowhitu, B., Kermoal, N., Andersen, C., Petersen, A., Reilly, M., Altamirano-Jimenez, Rewi, P. (2010) Indigenous Identity and Resistance: Researching the Diversity of Knowledge. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.

Pihama, L. (Ed). (2015). Kaupapa Rangahau: A Reader. Te Kotahi, Waikato. www.waikato.ac.nz/rangahau

Smith, L.T. (2012). Decolonizing Methodologies Research and Indigenous Peoples. Zed Books: London and Otago University Press Dunedin

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Recommended Readings

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Readings and video resources will be available on Moodle. These recommended books are available in the Library.

Kovach, M (2009) Indigenous Methodologies Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts. University of Toronto Press Toronto

Nakata, M. (2007) Disciplining the Savages Savaging the Disciplines Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra

Said, E. (1971) Orientalism Penguin London

Wilson, S (2008) Research is Ceremony Indigenous Research Methods. Fernwood, Halifax

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Other Resources

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The Moodle page will have a range of material, readings and videos that will augment your understandings and assist you with assignments.
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Online Support

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You can access the paper details (paper outline, files, assessment details, videos, reading lists, learning support, etc.) through Moodle. Moodle is available from your computer desktop when you log on. You can also access Moodle by going to http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz

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Workload

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You need to allocate at least 6 hours a week to this course. 3 Hours for the Lecture plus 3 hours for Moodle, reading and writing. It would be great if you spent a minimum of two consecutive hours a week just reading and viewing the material. I also recommend that you form coffee groups to discuss the course material as some of it is very contentious and needs discussion to help you process the ideas.
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