MAORI250-19A (HAM)

Māori Politics

15 Points

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Convenor(s)

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Paper Description

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This paper examines Māori and Indigenous politics in a broad sense, from key ideas such as sovereignty, tino rangatiratanga, and autonomy, through to crucial forms of resistance via various political structures including local, Iwi, national and global Indigenous movements. The aim of the course is to:

a) To develop your analytical skills in regards to Māori Politics, Māori Representation, and Māori Partnership with Treaty partners;
b) To understand the basis of Māori and Indigenous political movements and forms of resistance;
c) To critique Māori participation in political processes at local, regional, national, and international levels; and
d) To evaluate and deconstruct case studies which demonstrate the ability of Māori to influence political outcomes and policy settings.

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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught in English and consists of two lecture sessions per week and one online tutorial. Please note this means the Tutorial scheduled for Thursday will be replaced by the online tutorial. The lectures may include guest speakers and group discussion exercises.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Describe traditional and contemporary Māori political movements
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  • Analyse the role of the Treaty of Waitangi in the development of Māori political movements
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  • Explore Māori and indigenous politics across different domains and contexts
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  • Describe how political arrangements and forms of development, and models of representation have advanced kaupapa Māori
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  • Demonstrate an ability to articulate their own ideas relating to Māori politics in a scholarly manner in written and oral forms
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Assessment

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There are five assessment items for this paper.

There are no compulsory components in this paper. However, to gain maximum understanding of content and to pass this paper successfully it is essential that you attend all lectures and submit all assignments.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Moodle Test
24 Mar 2019
9:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Essay 1
14 Apr 2019
9:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Debate
3 May 2019
9:00 PM
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Online Participation
26 May 2019
9:00 PM
10
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
5. Essay 2
2 Jun 2019
9:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Students will be directed to any required readings. These will be on the MAORI250 19A(HAM) Reading List posted on Moodle.

All other readings are recommended and will be identified from time to time and posted on Moodle.

Students that are new to Māori and Indigenous Studies are encouraged to read the recommended readings.

Week 1: What is Māori politics?

Winiata, M. (2014). Leadership in Pre-European Maori Society. In The changing role of the leader in Māori society: a study in social change and race relations (pp. 33–52). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato.

Stevens, M. (2015). Māori political history. In J. Hayward (Ed.), New Zealand government and politics (Sixth edition, pp. 4–14). South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Week 2: Te Tiriti o Waitangi and The Treaty of Waitangi

Hayward, J. (2018). He Whakaputanga me te Tiriti: The Declaration and the Treaty. In M. Reilly, G. Leoni, L. Carter, S. Duncan, L. Paterson, M. T. Ratima, & P. Rewi (Eds.), Te kōparapara: an introduction to the Māori world (pp. 180–193). Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press.

Mikaere, A. (2013). Te Tiriti and the Treaty: Seeking to Reconcile the Irreconcilable in the Name of Truth. In Colonising Myths - Maori Realities: He Rukuruku Whakaaro. Wellington2: Huia (NZ) Ltd.

Week 3: Māori Political Movements

Katene, S. (2013) The spirit of Māori leadership, pp. 53-80. Huia Publishers: Wellington; Walker,

Walker, R. (2004). Ka whawhai tonu matou – Struggle without end, pp. 186-219. Penguin Books: New Zealand.

Week 4: Māori in Parliament and Māori Voting Patterns

Sullivan, A. (2010). Democracy and Minority Indigenous Representation. In Weeping waters: the Treaty of Waitangi and constitutional change. Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers.

Sullivan, A. (2003). Māori Representation in Local Government. In Local government and the Treaty of Waitangi (pp. 135–156). Melbourne, Vic, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Bargh, M. (2015). The Māori seats. In J. Hayward (Ed.), New Zealand government and politics (Sixth edition, pp. 300–310). South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Week 5: Maori Participation in Regional and Local Government

Cheyne, C., & Tawhai, V. (2007). He wharemoa te rakau, ka mahue. Maori engagement with local government: Knowledge, experiences and recommendations. Palmerston North: Massey University.

Waikato Regional Council. (2017). Maori engagement framework: He ritenga mahi tahi. Hamilton: Waikato Regional Council. Retrieved from https://www.waikatoregion.govt.nz/assets/WRC/Council/Policy-and-Plans/11340016-Maori-Engagement-Framework-Guide.pdf

Webster, K., & Cheyne, C. (2017). Creating Treaty-based local governance in New Zealand: Māori and Pākehā views. Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences, 12(2), 146–164.

Bargh, M. (2012) ‘New Māori Politics1990s-2000s’ in Keenan, D (ed) Huia Histories of Māori: Ngā Tāhuhu Kōrero, pp. 277-292. Huia Publishers: Wellington.

Week 6: The Emergence of Co-Governance

Hudson, M., Collier, K., Awatere, S., Harmsworth, G., Henry, J., Quinn, J., … Robb, M. (2016). Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into Freshwater Management: An Aotearoa/New Zealand Case Study. International Journal for Science in Society, 8(1).

Aho, L. Te. (2014). Ruruku Whakatupua Te Mana o te Awa Tupua [Upholding the Mana of the Whanganui River]. Maori Law Review. Retrieved from http://maorilawreview.co.nz/2014/05/ruruku-whakatupua-te-mana-o-te-awa-tupua-upholding-the-mana-of-the-whanganui-river/

Simon, H. (2016). Te Arewhana Kei Roto i Te Rūma: An Indigenous Neo-Disputatio on Settler Society, Nullifying Te Tiriti, ‘Natural Resources’ and Our Collective Future in Aotearoa New Zealand, Te Kaharoa9(1). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.24135/tekaharoa.v9i1.6

Sandercock, L. (2004). Commentary: indigenous planning and the burden of colonialism. Planning Theory & Practice, 5(1). https://doi.org/10.1080/1464935042000204240

Week 7: Treaty Settlements

Te Whakatohea Agreement in Principle. Retrieved from https://www.govt.nz/dmsdocument/7070-whakatohea-agreement-in-principle-18-august-2017

He Whakaaro: Tūhoe settlement shows how far we have come. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ngaitahu.iwi.nz/our_stories/whakaarotuhoe-settlement-shows-far-come/

Tuhoe Claims Settlement Act 2014. Retrieved from http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2014/0050/latest/DLM5481230.html

Maori Law Review: Special Issue – The Tūhoe-Crown Settlement. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.ngaituhoe.iwi.nz/vdb/document/77

Week 11: Mana Motuhake and Tino Rangatiratanga

Simon, H. (2016). Te Arewhana Kei Roto i Te Rūma: An Indigenous Neo-Disputatio on Settler Society, Nullifying Te Tiriti, ‘Natural Resources’ and Our Collective Future in Aotearoa New Zealand, Te Kaharoa9 (1). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.24135/tekaharoa.v9i1.6

Tomas, N. (2013). Maori Concepts and Practices of Rangatiratanga: "Sovereignty” (pp. 220–249). Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.

Hayward, J. (2017, November 6). Professorial Address: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the Constitution, and our political imagination. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=janine+hayward+otago

Week 12: Indigenous Sovereignty: Advancing Indigenous Aspiration

Emerson, L. (2017). DINÉ SOVEREIGN ACTION: Rejecting Colonial Sovereignty and Invoking Diné Peacemaking. In L. Lee (Ed.) (pp. 160–178). Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Dominic O’Sullivan. (2017). The Politics of Indigeneity. In Indigeneity: A Politics of Potential (pp. 35–49). Bristol: Policy Press.

Week 13: Kaupapa Māori Issues of Significance

Bargh, M. (2012). New Māori Politics 1990s-2000s. In Huia histories of Māori: ngā tāhuhu kōrero (pp. 277–292). Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers.

Mutu, M. (2013). Te Tiriti o Waitangi in a Future Constitution: Removing the Shackles of Colonisation. Retrieved from http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/shackles-of-colonisation.pdf

Makite Mai Aotearoa. (2016). He Whakaaro Whakaumu mo Aotearoa: The Report of Makite Mai Aotearoa - The Independent Working Group on Constitutional Transformation. Auckland: Makite Mai Aotearoa. Retrieved from http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/MatikeMaiAotearoaReport.pdf

Week 14: The Future of Māori Politics

Simon, H. (2016). Te Arewhana Kei Roto i Te Rūma: An Indigenous Neo-Disputatio on Settler Society, Nullifying Te Tiriti, ‘Natural Resources’ and Our Collective Future in Aotearoa New Zealand, 9(1). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.24135/tekaharoa.v9i1.6

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Recommended Readings

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  • Bargh, M, ed. Māori and Parliament: Diverse Strategies and Compromises. Wellington: Huia, 2010.
  • Bargh, M. (2007). Resistance : An indigenous response to neoliberalism. Wellington, N.Z.: Huia.
  • Cox, L. (1993). Kotahitanga : The search for Māori political unity. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford University Press.
  • Cheyne, C. M., & Tawhai, V. M. (2008). He wharemoa te rakau, ka mahue. Maori engagement with local government: Knowledge, experiences and recommendations. A research project supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fund (MAU-039) Palmerston North:
  • Durie, M. Te Mana, Te Kawanatanga: The Politics of Māori Self-determination. Auckland: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Durie, M. (2005). Ngā Tai Matatū Tides of Māori endurance. Auckland, N.Z., Oxford University Press.
  • Hayward, J. (2015). New Zealand government and politics (Sixth ed.). New York: Oxford University Press
  • Higgins, R., Rewi, P., and Olsen Reeder, V. (eds). (2014) The Value of the Māori Language: Te Hua o te Reo Māori. Wellington, Huia Publishers.
  • Ivason, D., Patton, P. & Sanders, W. (2000) Political theory and the rights of indigenous peoples. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press
  • Katene, S. (2013). The spirit of Māori leadership. Wellington: Huia Publishers
  • Keenan, D. (2012). Huia histories of Māori : Ngā tāhuhu kōrero. Wellington, N.Z.: Huia.
  • Lee, L., & Denetdale, J. (2017). Navajo Sovereignty : Understandings and Visions of the Diné People. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
  • Lerma, M. (2014). Indigenous sovereignty in the 21st century: knowledge for the indigenous spring. Gainesville: Florida Academic Press.
  • McIntosh, T. & Mulholland, M. (eds) (2011). Māori and Social Issues. Wellington: Huia Publishers.
  • Moreton-Robinson, A. (2016). The white possessive : Property, power, and indigenous sovereignty. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Mulholland, M. and Tawhai, V. (eds) (2010) Weeping Waters: The Treaty of Waitangi and Constitutional Change, Wellington: Huia. Visit http://vicbooks.co.nz to check price and availability.
  • Mutu, M. (2013). “Te Tiriti o Waitangi in a Future Constitution: Removing the Shackles of Colonisation.” 2013 Robson Lecture, Napier.
  • O’Sullivan, D. (2017). Indigeneity: A politics of potential: Australia, Fiji and New Zealand. Bristol: Policy Press.
  • Simon, H. (2016). Te Arewhana Kei Roto i Te Rūma: An Indigenous Neo-Disputatio on Settler Society, Nullifying Te Tiriti, ‘Natural Resources’ and Our Collective Future in Aotearoa New Zealand. Te Kaharoa, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.24135/tekaharoa.v9i1.6
  • Smith, L, T., (1999) Decolonising Methodologies, research and indigenous people; Dunedin: Zed Books University of Otago Press, c1999.
  • Tomlins Jahnke, H. & Mulholland, M. (eds). (2011). Mana Tangata: Politics of Empowerment. Wellington: Huia Publishers.
  • Waikato Regional Council. (2017). Maori engagement framework: He ritenga mahi tahi. Hamilton. Retrieved from https://www.waikatoregion.govt.nz/assets/WRC/Council/Policy-and-Plans/11340016-Maori-Engagement-Framework-Guide.pdf
  • Walker, R. (2004). Ka whawhai tonu mātou = Struggle without end (Rev. ed.). Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin.
  • Webster, K., & Cheyne, C. (2017). Creating Treaty-based local governance in New Zealand: Māori and Pākehā views. Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 12(2), 146-164. https://doi.org/10.1080/1177083X.2017.1345766
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Online Support

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This paper is supported by Moodle. Look at Moodle weekly for paper readings, notices and other relevant information. Should the lecturer also wish to commmunicate outside of class hours this will normally be by News Forum on Moodle.
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Workload

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This paper has 4 contact hours weekly. Students are expected to attend all lectures and complete the required readings. This paper is worth 15 points and has a workload of 150 hours (1 point is worth 10 hours).
1. Lectures: 1 x 2 hours, 1 x 1 hour weekly - 36 Hours

2. Tutorials: 1 x 1 hour weekly - 12 hours

3. Self­-Directed Learning: 8.5 hours weekly - 102 Hours

Total: 150 hours

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