MAORI303-19B (HAM)

Critical Indigenous Theory

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Te Pua Wananga ki te Ao
Te Pua Wananga ki te Ao Dean's Office

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: hinerangi.kara@waikato.ac.nz
: mahue.dewes@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content
This paper looks at the key theoretical influences, from Marx to post-structuralism, upon critical Indigenous Studies and the most significant writings by those Indigenous scholars who have chosen to engage with critical theory.
Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content
The course is taught with a two hour lecture that will also incorporate group discussions and seminars and with resource backup using Moodle.
Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Content knowledge

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the key theoretical influences on critical Indigenous Studies

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Engagement with the work of Indigenous research experts

    1. Be aware and demonstrate an understanding of key critical theoretical writings of Indigenous scholars

    2. Be aware of the complex nature of Indigenous critical theory

    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

Course work/Final examination Ratio 1:0

Course Work 100%.

There is no final external examination or test.

Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Reflective Diary
36
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Key Terms
2 Aug 2019
5:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. In-class Participation
10
4. Essay Proposal
20 Sep 2019
5:00 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Essay
11 Oct 2019
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Andersen, Chris (2015). ‘Urban landscapes of North America’. In Warrior, Robert (ed.), The World of Indigenous North America. Routledge: London/New York, pp. 149-170.

Corntassel, Jeff (2012). ‘Re-envisioning resurgence: Indigenous pathways to decolonization and sustainable self-determination’. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 1 (1), pp. 86-101.

Coulthard, Glen (2014). ‘From wards of the State to subjects of recognition? Marx, Indigenous peoples, and the politics of dispossession in Denendeh’. In Audra Simpson and Andrea Smith (eds.), Theorizing Native Studies, Duke University Press: Durham, pp. 56-98.

Coulthard, Glen (2014). ‘Seeing red: Reconciliation and Resentment’. In, Red Skins, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Fanon, Frantz (1967). ‘The fact of Blackness’. In Black Skin, White Masks. C.L. Markmann (trans.). New York: Grove Weidenfeld, pp. 82-108.

Goeman, Mishauna (2013). ‘”Remember what you are”: Gendering Citizenship, the Indian Act, and (re)mapping the settler nation-state’. In Mark My Words: Native Women Mapping Our Nations. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 41-85.

Hau’ofa, Epeli (1993). ‘Our sea of islands.’ In A New Oceania: Rediscovering Our Sea of Islands. Suva: School of Social and Economic Development, The University of the South Pacific/Beake House, pp. 2-17.

Hokowhitu, Brendan (2016). ‘Monster’. In Aileen Moreton-Robinson (ed.), Critical Indigenous Studies: Engagements in First World Locations, University of Arizona Press: Tucson, pp. 83-101.

Justice, Daniel Heath (2016). ‘A better world becoming: Placing Critical Indigenous Studies’. In Aileen Moreton-Robinson (ed.), Critical Indigenous Studies: Engagements in First World Locations, University of Arizona Press: Tucson, pp. 19-32.

Kauanui, J. Kēhaulani (2018). ‘Gender, marriage and coverture’. In Paradoxes of Hawaiian Sovereignty: Land, Sex, and the Colonial Politics of State Nationalism, Duke University Press: Durham, pp. 113-152.

Lomawaima, K. Tsianina (2015). ‘Education’, In Warrior, Robert (ed.), The World of Indigenous North America. Routledge: London/New York, pp. 365-387.

Million, Dian (2014). ‘There is a river in me: Theory from life’. In Audra Simpson and Andrea Smith (eds.), Theorizing Native Studies, Duke University Press: Durham, pp. 31-42.

Moreton-Robinson, Aileen (2015). ‘The house that Jack built: Britishness and white possession’. In, The White Possessive: Property, Power, and Indigenous Sovereignty, University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, pp. 19-32.

Roberts, Mere. (2012). ‘Revisiting the natural world of the Māori’. In Huia Histories of Māori, Danny Keenan (ed.), pp. 33-56. Wellington: Huia.

Simpson, Audra (2014). ‘Indigenous interruptions: Mohawk nationhood, citizenship and the State’. In Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States. Durham: Duke University Press, pp. 1-35.

Teves, Lani (2018). ‘Bound in place: Queer Indigenous mobilities and “The Old Paniolo Way”’. In, Defiant Indigeneity: The Politics of Hawaiian Performance, University of North Carolinal Press: Chapel Hill, pp. 145-169.

Tuck, Eve & Yang, Wayne (2012). ‘Decolonization is not a metaphor’. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 1 (1), pp. 1-40.

Edit Required Readings Content

Other Resources

Edit Other Resources Content
The Moodle page will have a range of material and readings that will augment your understandings and assist you with assignments.
Edit Other Resources Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
You can access the paper details (paper outline, files, assessment details, videos, reading lists, learning support, etc.) through Moodle. Moodle is available from your computer desktop when you log on. You can also access Moodle by going to http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
This is a 15 point paper, which equates, in total, to 150 hours of student work. You need to allocate at least 6-7 hours a week to this course. 2 Hours for the Lecture, plus 4-5 hours for Moodle reading and writing. It would be great if you spent a minimum of two consecutive hours a week just reading and viewing the material. I also recommend that you form groups to discuss the course material as some of it is complex and needs discussion to help you process the ideas.
Edit Workload Content