MKTG470-17A (TGA)

Digital Marketing

20 Points

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Waikato Management School
Te Raupapa
Department of Marketing

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: bobbie.wisneski@waikato.ac.nz
: lori.jervis@waikato.ac.nz
: quentin.somerville@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

: dawn.picken@waikato.ac.nz

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: kathryn.mercer@waikato.ac.nz
: clive.wilkinson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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This paper aims to provide an introduction to concepts behind digital marketing, as well as some practical experience of a few of the tools currently being used – and awareness of a lot more of them. Your understanding of marketing and strategy from other courses will be applied to digital platforms and technologies.

The course will have a strong practical element that is introduced in labs and which will require self-study outside of class time.
There are several important caveats to studying digital marketing:

  1. There is a lot of confusion and misunderstanding about what Digital Marketing actually is. In this course, it is treated as, “Any aspect of marketing that uses digital platforms either wholly or partially as part of a marketing strategy.” That means that almost all modern marketing comes under this heading. Concepts learnt in earlier, more academic courses such as Marketing 151, Consumer Behaviour, Marketing Strategy, Marketing Analytics, and Advertising & Promotions, all come into play in implementing a digital strategy.
  2. In addition, while most students studying a 300 or 400 level course here in New Zealand have not yet had a need to develop a marketing strategy in the real world, almost everyone has direct experience in digital marketing, just as everyone has used a shop or seen an advert. In actuality, how to develop and ad campaign, design a questionnaire, or run a retail store, are all today superseded by digital alternatives, and even as customers, you are probably more aware of those alternatives than of the ‘traditional’, analog (non-digital) methods taught in classrooms. Some of you will have used digital marketing in your jobs already. The range of knowledge within the class will, therefore, be quite diverse. Unlike most courses, there is no single, baseline starting point for the majority of students enrolled.
  3. Just as marketing is core to any business, so today and into the future, that will mean digital marketing. As an extreme example, even for a business with no web presence, even on Facebook, or even no e-mail address, it’s likely that customers will find your location by searching for you online. You cannot avoid it. In addition, digital tools allow marketing strategy to be implemented more efficiently, more effectively, and often more creatively than ever before. New options and techniques (for example, Pokemon GO!) appear all the time. While the majority of courses teach ‘textbook’ marketing concepts that have evolved over the past 20-50 years, digital marketing is by necessity a very practical, career requirement. Even where marketing is outsourced, you still need to be able to evaluate strategy proposals and interpret outcomes.

In summary, digital marketing is today so pervasive that, in the real world at least, ‘marketing’ and ‘digital marketing’ are one and the same thing.

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Paper Structure

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The paper is taught over 12 weeks with a variety of delivery mechanisms.

It will adopt a so-called 'blended' learning approach. In other words, of the four hours of contact time per week, two will be conducted online and two will be in the classroom. Lecture-style content will be online – you will mostly work through this yourself, individually.

The Paper is structured as follows:
  • Digital Marketing in a Marketing Strategy Context
  • Digital Marketing Tools and Techniques
  • The Role of Social Media
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Create a digital marketing strategy plan suitable to meet specific marketing goals.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Analyse and report on potential markets for use in planning a digital marketing strategy, drawing on consumer market data and reports.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Evaluate elements of digital marketing for application within a particular strategy.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Creatively produce some elements to be used in a digital marketing strategy, in particular types of website applicable to a marketing strategy.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of digital marketing tools and applications.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Select the best digital tools for a particular marketing strategy.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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NOTE: The website assignment is split into 4 separate stages, each with its own deadline. The first three stages are small, set-up assignments, with the bulk of the grade awarded for the final submission at the end of the course.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Build a Website: Stage 1 One Page plan for your website
14 Mar 2017
5:00 PM
4
  • Other: Google Classroom
2. Build a Website: Stage 2: Establish the Website online
21 Mar 2017
5:00 PM
4
  • Other: Google Classroom
3. Build a Website Stage 3: Add Google Analytics account to your site
4 Apr 2017
5:00 PM
4
  • Other: Google Classroom
4. Build a Website: Stage 4: Add content to the site and on social media
9 Jun 2017
5:00 PM
28
  • Other: Google Classroom
5. Create a Social Media Marketing Plan
16 May 2017
5:00 PM
20
  • Other: Google Classroom
6. Market Personas for Digital Marketing Strategy
25 Apr 2017
5:00 PM
20
  • Other: Google Classroom
7. "Expert Session" Reports
2 Jun 2017
5:00 PM
15
  • Other: Google Classroom
8. Quizzes based on Individual Topics
2 Jun 2017
5:00 PM
5
  • Other: Stukent website or Google Classroom
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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The required text for this course is as follows:

Larson, J. and Draper, S. (2017) ‘Digital Marketing Essentials’, Stukent.

This is an online-only textbook. You must register and buy a license to access it. The Chapter quizzes are taken from the book, so the text is 'required', but we are arranging for two copies to be kept in library reserve.

For more details about the book before purchase, please see: https://www.stukent.com/internet-marketing-textbook/

To purchase a license for the book use the following link: https://home.stukent.com/join/E1C-71E

NOTE: Purchasing of the 'Mimic Intro' simulation is OPTIONAL. Please do not buy until explained in the course.

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Recommended Readings

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Most readings and materials will be made available online through Google Classroom.

The nature of digital marketing is such that materials prepared a year ago are now quite out of date. The following textbook provides a lot of detail, but has some very old references even in the newest edition. I do not recommend purchasing it, but it might be useful to reference in the library.

Chaffey, D., & Ellis-Chadwick, F. (2015). Digital marketing. 6th edition Pearson Higher Ed.

The author's own website has better information: http://www.smartinsights.com/

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Other Resources

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Other resources will be made available online throughout the course and in weekly Computer Labs.
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Online Support

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This course will make extensive use of Google Classroom for out-of-class study, exercises, feedback, peer review, and assignment submissions. Visit the Moodle page and get used to the content as soon as you can.

Note: MKTG370, MKTG470 and MKTG470 (TGA) all use the same online content.

Google Classroom

  1. You MUST use your university email account to access the site. If necessary, on http://classroom.google.com, click on the email address top right of page, and switch to your university account. (You may need to "Add Account" if you use a private email on Google usually.)
  2. Once logged in, click the "+" button top right, and choose "Join Class"
  3. Enter the following code: syahuzn
  4. You will be taken to the Digital Marketing course. Be sure to bookmark the course for later use.

Please feel free to email the instructor at any time, visit during office hours, or arrange an appointment. My email is Roy Larke.


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Workload

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Student workload should be distributed roughly as follows:

  • In-class time: 3-hours per week
  • Self-study online: 6-8 hours a week
  • Assignment preparation time: 2 hours a week
  • Content reflection and peer content review: 1-2 hours a week
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

MKTG251 or MKTG351

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

MKTG452 and MKTG370

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