MNMGT581-21A (HAM)

Research Methods in Management Studies

30 Points

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Division of Management
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Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: denise.martin@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

: geua.boe-gibson@waikato.ac.nz

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: nat.enright@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
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Paper Description

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This paper introduces students to a range of methods for undertaking research in the social sciences, including interpretivist and positivist methods.The paper introduces students to the conceptual and methodological skills needed to think and perform as researchers.The required competencies are developed through the generation of a research proposal and subsequent report in a field of interest tot he student and critiques of methodological approaches found in the academic literature. At the end of the semester, students will be required to submit a research proposal in their area of interest addressing all steps in the research process, viz. generation of a research question,literature review,choosing an appropriate method to answer the question, and descriptions of proposed methods of data collection and data analysis.

Key objectives of the paper include:

1.To acquaint students with the methods of research in management studies;

2.To educate students in the theory­-centred elements of research methods, providing them with an appreciation of how theories are developed and tested;

3.To familiarise students with a broad repertoire of research methods;

4.To apply different methods in a real research project;and

5.To develop the ability to critically evaluate published research.

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Paper Structure

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The formal part of the course consists of online workshops that will take place via Zoom. Students are expected to log into the Zoom
workshops and participate. The Zoom workshops will be recorded and the recordings will be available on Panopto for students to
access during the semester. The timetable for the workshops is provided below.

The emphasis during the workshops is on discussion and sharing of ideas and experiences. Students are expected to have read the
recommended readings before the scheduled workshops. In this paper, the lecturers will give advice primarily on methods issues. For
domain specific knowledge, students are encouraged to contact their department.

The paper outline identifies the lecturer/s who will take the lead for each section but expect a range of participants to be involved.
It is expected students will always be ready to participate and provide both questions and ideas.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Understand
    Understand how to design a research project and be able to discuss general frameworks for and approaches to research.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Perform
    Be able to perform a comprehensive literature review of a chosen area of research
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  • Critical Analysis

    Critically read and evaluate published research; be able to critically analyze the comparative strengths and weaknesses of different research strategies for a given research question

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  • Understand the Research Process

    Understand the research process and the literature, tools and techniques associated with each phase of the process from library research through objective specification, topic analysis, hypothesis formulation, selection of the research strategies and design, data collection, and analysis, to the preparation of publishable research reports.

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  • Discipline Familiarity
    Have a familiarity with important issues and papers, past and current, in their fields.
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  • Ethics and Referencing
    Comply with academic research ethics and referencing standards.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Preliminary Research Topic Paper Review
19 Mar 2021
5:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Annotated Bibliography
2 Apr 2021
5:00 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Methods Description
14 May 2021
5:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Take Home Test: Case Study in Management Research
11 Jun 2021
5:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Final Quiz
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Management Research Proposal
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Reading List Link

All readings are available online through the University Library's website. More readings will be informed during the course of the semester.

  1. Saunders, Mark; Lewis, Philip and Thornhill, Adrian (2016) Research Methods for Business Students, 7ed, ISBN: 978-1-292-01665-8, Pearson Education Limited
  2. Bhattacherjee, A. (2012). Social science research: Principles, methods, and practices.
  3. Ariff, M. I. M., Milton, S. K., Bosua, R., & Sharma, R. (2011). Exploring The Role Of ICT In The Formation Of Transactive Memory Systems In Virtual Teams Paper presented at the Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, Brisbane, Australia.
  4. Golden-Biddle, K., & Locke, K. (2007). Composing qualitative research: Sage.
  5. Hope, T., Chew, E., & Sharma, R. (2017). The Failure of Success Factors: Lessons from Success and Failure Cases of Enterprise Architecture Implementation [Best Paper Nominee]. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGMIS Conference on Computers and People Research.
  6. Lewis, B. R., Templeton, G. F., & Byrd, T. A. (2005). A methodology for construct development in MIS research. European Journal of Information Systems, 14(4), 388-400.
  7. Locke, K., & Golden-Biddle, K. (1997). Constructing opportunities for contribution: Structuring intertextual coherence and “problematizing” in organizational studies. Academy of Management Journal, 40(5), 1023-1062.
  8. MacKenzie, S. B., Podsakoff, P. M., & Podsakoff, N. P. (2011). Construct measurement and validity assessment in behavioral research: integrating new and existing techniques. MIS Quarterly, 35(2), 293-334.
  9. Rivard, S. (2014). Editor's Comments: The Ions of Theory Construction. MIS Quarterly, 38(2), iii-xiii.
  10. Rossiter, J. R. (2002). The C-OAR-SE procedure for scale development in marketing. International journal of research in marketing, 19(4), 305-335.
  11. Sharma, R., Yetton, P. W., & Zmud, R. W. (2008). Implementation Costs of IS-Enabled Organizational Change. Information and Organization, 18(2), 73-100. doi:doi:10.1016/j.infoandorg.2007.09.001
  12. Straub, D. (2009a). Creating Blue Oceans of Thought Via Highly Citable Articles. MIS Quarterly, 33(4), iii-vii.
  13. Straub, D. (2009b). Why Top Journals Accept Your Paper. MIS Quarterly, 33(3), iii-x.
  14. Suddaby, R. (2010). Editor’s comments: Construct clarity in theories of management and organization. Academy of Management Review, 35(3), 346-357.
  15. Whetten, D. A. (1989). What Constitutes a Theoretical Contribution? Academy of Management Review, 14(4), 490-495.
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Online Support

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All course materials are available through Moodle.
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Workload

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This is a 500 level course, and the 30 points represents approximately 300 learning hours on the part of the students. This course runs over 13 weeks, students are expected to put in at least 25 hours per week of learning effort over the duration of the course.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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The intention of this course is to get you going on your masters or PhD dissertation or thesis. That is, the proposal written for this paper can serve as the basis for your thesis or dissertation to start in the course taken after MNGT 501. You should thus be able to hit the ground running in the semester following this course.
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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: MNGT501

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