MRKTG202-18A (HAM)

Consumer and Buyer Behaviour

15 Points

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Waikato Management School
Te Raupapa
School of Management and Marketing

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: helena.wang@waikato.ac.nz
: lori.jervis@waikato.ac.nz
: sade.lomas@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

: verity.coker@waikato.ac.nz

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: heather.morrell@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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The paper provides psychological and social frameworks for analysing and influencing consumer decision-making, focusing on attitudes, motivational drivers, heuristics and personality types, applicable to all five consumer decision stages.
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Paper Structure

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The paper is presented in a discussion based format. This means that course content is covered through class discussions and through workshop-style interactive tutorials. You are expected to come to class having pre-read the material, so that you are ready to participate and actively engage in lively in-class debates, simulations and other methods to enhance the theoretical content you will have read outside the classroom.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate specific knowledge about consumer psychology and consumer behaviour from the relevant literature on Consumer Behaviour.
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  • Understand, interpret and explain important concepts and models on consumer decision-making and motivation.
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  • Demonstrate a good working knowledge of the 5-stage buying and disposing behaviour of consumers.
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  • Discuss and apply critical concepts related to sensory marketing.
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  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of consumers' cognitive biases and the relevant research methodologies to study such biases.
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  • Evaluate the importance of various elements of the market system upon consumer behaviour.
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  • Appreciate marketers' roles in sustainable/ethical business practices.
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  • Apply the structure and format of formal business report writing to compare and contrast marketing tactics.
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Assessment

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Both individual and group assessments form part of the assessment portfolio for this paper. Group assessments make up 30% of the assessments, whilst individual assessments make up the other 70% of internal assessments.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assessment One
15 Mar 2018
3:00 PM
10
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
2. Test One
5 Apr 2018
3:00 PM
15
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
3. Assessment Two
12 Apr 2018
3:00 PM
10
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
4. Assessment Three
13 May 2018
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Test Two
24 May 2018
3:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Lecture
6. Test Three
20
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Consumer Behaviour: Implication for Marketing Strategy (7th edition): Quester, Pettigrew , Kopanidis, Rao Hill, Del, & Hawkins
ISBN Number: 9781743076811. See instructions to download e-book.
www.mhhe.com/au/questercb7e

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Recommended Readings

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Recommendations will be made throughout the term. These publications will come from peer reviewed journals and popular press and will be essential to assist in elucidating students' understanding of the material from a perspective outside the focus of the textbook.

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Other Resources

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** All journal articles below are optional reading and will not be examined.

Introduction: Consumers in the Marketplace
McKinsey Consumer Insights (General Resource)

Vince, G. (2012) Beating Our Consumption Habit, BBC, 7 July: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120712-beating-our-consumption-habit

Black, R. (2012) Population and Consumption key to the Future, says report, BBC, 26 April: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17829665

Motivation, Attention and Memory
Pieters, R. & Wedel, M. (2004). Attention capture and transfer in advertising: Brand, pictorial and text size effects. Journal of Marketing 68(2), 36-50.

Nedungadi, P. (1990). Recall and Consumer Consideration Sets: Influencing Choice without Altering Brand Evaluations. Journal of Consumer Research 17(3), 263.

Ford, John B.; Merchant, Altaf. (2010) Nostalgia Drives Donations., Journal of Advertising Research, Dec2010, Vol. 50 Issue 4, p450-459.

Attitude and Attitude Change
Shiv, B., Carmon, Z. & Ariely, D. (2006). Placebo effects of Marketing Actions: Consumer May get what They Paid For. Journal of Marketing Research 42(4) 383-393.

Personality and Self-Concept
Joel B. Cohen (1967) An Interpersonal Orientation to the Study of Consumer Behavior, Journal of Marketing Research , Vol. 4, No. 3 (Aug., 1967), pp. 270-278

Hazel H. Huang, Vincent-Wayne Mitchell, Richard Rosenaum-Elliott (2012) Are Consumer and Brand Personalities the Same? Psychology & Marketing, Volume 29, Issue 5, pages 334–349

Michael Bosnjak, Denis Bratko, Mirta Galesic, Tracy Tuten, (2007) Consumer personality and individual differences: Revitalizing a temporarily abandoned field, Journal of Business Research, Volume 60, Issue 6, June 2007, Pages 587-589,

Perception and Learning:
Kahneman, D. (2003). Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics [dagger]. The American Economic Review 93(5), 1449.

Bagozzi, R. P., Gopinath, M. & Nyer, P.U. (1999). The Role of Emotions in Marketing. Journal of Academy of Marketing Science 27(2), 184.

Lee, L., Frederick, S. & Ariely, D. (2006). Expectation, Consumption, and Revelation Psychological Science 17(1)2: 1054-1058

New Zealand Society, Demographics and Consumer Markets
Brooksbank, Roger; Garland, Ron; Taylor, David (2010), Strategic marketing in New Zealand companies, Journal of Global Marketing, 23 (1) : 33-44.

Consumer Decision Making Process
Ariely, D. & Levav, J. (2000). Sequential Choice in Group Settings: Taking the Road of Less Traveled and Less Enjoyed. Journal of Consumer Research 27(3), 279.

Communications and Consumers
Sabri, Ouidade (2012) Preliminary investigation of the communication effects of "taboo" themes in advertising. European Journal of Marketing, 46. 1/2 (2012): 215-236.

Groups: Family, Peer Groups and Opinion Leaders
Schaninger, C.M. & Putrevu, S. (2006). Dual Spousal Work Involvement: An Alternative Method to Classify Households/Families. Academy of Marketing Science Review 8, 1, 1-21.

O'Cass, A. & Clarke, P. (2002). Dear Santa: do you have my brand? Journal of Consumer Behaviour 2(1), 37-53.

Culture, Sub-Culture and Social Class
Henry, P.C. (2005). Social Class, Market Situation, and Consumers' Metaphors of (Dis)Empowerment. Journal of Consumer Research 31(4), 766-779.

Arnould, E.J., & Thompson, C.J. (2005). Consumer Culture Theory (CCT): Twenty Years of Research. Journal of Consumer Research 31(4), 868-882.

Valentyna Melnyk and Stijn M. J. van Osselaer (2012), Make me special: Gender differences in consumers’ responses to loyalty programs, Marketing Letters, Online First™, 24 January 2012

Consumer Problems, Issues & Marketing
Vincent Egan, David Taylor (2010) Shoplifting, unethical consumer behaviour, and personality, Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 48, Issue 8, June 2010, Pages 878-883

BBC (2007) UK Consumers Happy to Own Fakes. 23 July. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/6910710.stm
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Online Support

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Moodle will be used to communicate with and between students. Support in the form of additional explanation and coordinating material will also be posted in Moodle. Students are welcomed to schedule remote appointments for feedback on assessments on platforms like Skype and Google Hangouts as well.
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Workload

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Students are expected to attend three hours of class (excluding one hour tutorials) per week and supplement these in-class and in-group learning opportunities with approximately 110 additional preparation hours, which is a combination of pre-class readings, group meetings and preparation of formal assignments (also called assessments). The one 1-hour tutorials students should attend each week are not compulsory, additional work that might be examined will be done during these tutorials, and work on group assessments as well as group feedback will be progressed during some of the tutorial sessions.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: MRKTG101 or MKTG151

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: MKTG255, MKTG355

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