MRKTG202-18B (HAM)

Consumer and Buyer Behaviour

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Waikato Management School
Te Raupapa
School of Management and Marketing

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: sade.lomas@waikato.ac.nz
: lori.jervis@waikato.ac.nz
: helena.wang@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

: jessica.corkery@waikato.ac.nz

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: heather.morrell@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

The paper provides psychological and social frameworks for analysing and influencing consumer decision-making, such as attitudes, motivations, heuristics, personality traits, and normative influence.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

The paper is presented through lectures and tutorials, both of which will be interactive. Students are expected to come to class having completed assigned readings in advance, so that they can engage in in-class discussions and exercises.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Identify, define, compare and contrast key concepts in consumer behaviour;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Generalize concepts from one consumer behaviour context (e.g., industry) to another (i.e., identify or describe how the concept does and does not apply to a new context);
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Evaluate marketing strategies and tactics in terms of potential effectiveness with a target consumer; and
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Evaluate marketing strategies and tactics in terms of social responsibility.
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

Students will develop an understanding of the psychological, cultural and sociological factors that influence purchase and consumption, the methods by which we learn about consumer behaviour, and the implications of consumer behaviour for product design and marketing. The application of marketing concepts requires highly-developed analytical skills; in marketing practice, lessons learned from one industry are frequently applied to very different industries.Thus, students will demonstrate learning through:

  • Identifying, defining, comparing and contrasting key concepts in consumer behaviour;
  • Generalizing concepts from one consumer behaviour context (e.g., industry) to another (i.e., identify or describe how the concept does and does not apply to a new context);
  • Evaluating marketing strategies and tactics in terms of potential effectiveness with a target consumer; and
  • Evaluating marketing strategies and tactics in terms of social responsibility.

In addition, students will demonstrate learning through effective oral and written communication, and through effective teamwork. These skills are regularly cited by employers as critical to success in business. Communication and teamwork are critical to bringing ideas to fruition.

Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Syllabus Quiz
19 Jul 2018
1:00 PM
5
  • In Class: In Lecture
2. Test 1
26 Jul 2018
1:00 PM
10
  • In Class: In Lecture
3. Test 2
6 Sep 2018
1:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Test 3
11 Oct 2018
1:00 PM
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
5. Project Part 1
17 Aug 2018
1:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Project Part 2
25 Oct 2018
3:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Participation
20
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Quester, P., S. Pettigrew, F. Kopanidis, S. R. Hill and D. Hawkins (2016), Consumer Behaviour:Implications for Marketing Strategy. North Ryde NSW:McGraw-Hill Education.

Volo, S. (2010), “Bloggers’ reported tourist experiences: Their utility as a tourism data source and their effect on prospective tourists,” Journal of Vacation Marketing, 16(4), 297-311.

Additional materials will be assigned throughout the semester. These materials may include short readings from popular press or from websites and/or videos available online or through the library.

Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Recommendations for additional reading will be made throughout the semester. Any material clearly identified as “recommended” or “optional” will not be tested.

The following works are recommended:

Schwartz, Barry (2016), The paradox of choice. New York:Ecco.

Underhill, Paco (2008), Why we buy: the science of shopping. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Wansink, Brian (2007), Mindless eating: Why we eat more than we think. New York:Bantam.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content

Moodle will be used to communicate with students. Some course material may be delivered online through Moodle; participation in online learning may replace some scheduled classroom time. Scores, course documents, announcements, and resources will be posted in Moodle. Students are advised to check the Moodle course site daily.

Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content

Students are expected to attend three hours of lecture and one hour of tutorial per week and supplement these in-class and in-group learning opportunities with approximately 110 additional preparation hours, which is a combination of pre-class readings, group meetings and preparation of formal assignments (also called assessments).

Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: MRKTG101 or MKTG151

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: MKTG255, MKTG355

Edit Linkages Content