MRKTG202-19B (TGA)

Consumer and Buyer Behaviour

15 Points

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Division of Management
School of Management and Marketing

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: uwt@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: nat.enright@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper introduces and integrates concepts from economics, psychology, and sociology that help to explain how and why consumers may desire, acquire, use, and dispose of goods, services, and ideas, in the creation of their environment and identities.

We will explore: how consumers learn and make decisions about products and brands; why their personal characteristics, styles, emotions, and experiences impact on that learning and decision-making, and; how their surrounding cultures and social groups also influence learning and decision-making processes. It is from these understandings that we can devise strategies, define segments, build positions, and effectively activate our marketing mix to create and leverage brand equity.

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Paper Structure

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The paper is presented through lectures, videos, readings, discussions, writings and interactive exercises. Some content will be delivered and learning activities will take place online via Moodle.

You are expected to come to class having pre-read the assigned course materials, so that you are ready to participate and actively engage in lively in-class discussions, debates, exercises, and other learning activities.

1. Lectures will be used to (a) clarify any questions you have from your reading, (b) highlight important concepts, theories and principles relating to the consumers and how they identify, engage and experience the world through products and services (c) consider marketing strategies and tactics in relation to consumer behaviour concepts, and (d) set the context for assessments.

2. Tutorials are where we will extend and apply the learning from the lectures, textbook, course materials, and your own consumer experiences. Specific goals of the tutorial program are to provide an opportunity for students to engage in a more personal way with course learning. In-tutorial discussion will be integral to the learning process, and your participation will be assessed. The tutorial sessions augment and build on the theoretical content that you have read at home, and assist in extending our understandings of different consumption contexts and problems.

3. Guest speaker(s) will extend student learning by discussing how concepts, theories and principles covered in the course are applied and adapted in a real-world business.

4. Assessments: Assessments are critical to student learning. I have designed a range of assessments based on the philosophy that assessments are another opportunity for students to learn (assessment-for-learning). Some assessments are designed to get you 'out and about', observing, analysing, engaging with, and sharing consumer behaviour in the 'real world'. For more details of the assessments for this paper, see the Assessment section below. Additional details will be given in class.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate specific knowledge about consumer psychology and consumer behaviour from the relevant literature;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand, interpret, and explain important concepts and models on consumer decision-making and motivation;
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  • Demonstrate a good working knowledge of the stages of buying and disposing behaviour of consumers;
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  • Discuss and apply critical concepts related to sensory marketing;
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  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of consumers' cognitive biases and the relevant research methodologies to study such biases;
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  • Evaluate the importance of various elements of the market system on consumer behaviour;
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  • Appreciate marketers' role in sustainable/ethical business practices; and
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  • Understand the structure and format of formal business report writing.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Students will develop an understanding of the psychological, cultural and sociological factors that influence purchase and consumption, the methods by which we learn about consumer behaviour, and the implications of consumer behaviour for product design and marketing. The application of marketing concepts requires highly-developed analytical skills; in marketing practice, lessons learned from one industry are frequently applied to very different industries.Thus, students will demonstrate learning through:

  • Identifying, defining, comparing and contrasting key concepts in consumer behaviour;
  • Generalizing concepts from one consumer behaviour context (e.g., industry) to another (i.e., identify or describe how the concept does and does not apply to a new context);
  • Evaluating marketing strategies and tactics in terms of potential effectiveness with a target consumer; and
  • Evaluating marketing strategies and tactics in terms of social responsibility.

In addition, students will demonstrate learning through effective oral and written communication, and through effective teamwork. These skills are regularly cited by employers as critical to success in business. Communication and teamwork are critical to bringing ideas to fruition.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Tests (General Information)
0
2. Test 1
30 Jul 2019
4:00 PM
10
  • In Class: In Tutorial
3. Test 2
3 Sep 2019
4:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Tutorial
4. Test 3
15 Oct 2019
6:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Photo Essay
6 Aug 2019
4:00 PM
10
  • Presentation: In Class
6. Group Project and Presentation
30 Sep 2019
1:00 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
  • Presentation: In Class
7. Participation
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Solomon, Michael R., R. Russell-Bennett and J. Previte (2019), Consumer Behaviour:Buying, Having, Being, 4th Ed. Melbourne:Pearson. A copy is on reserve at the library. A paperback copy can be purchased from the bookstore. An electronic version is available for purchase as an eText here:http://www.pearsoned.co.nz/9781488615757.

A business case (specific title to be announced) from Harvard Business School Publishing. This case will be made available by download.

Additional materials will be assigned throughout the semester. These materials may include short readings from popular press or from websites and/or videos available online or through the library.

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Recommended Readings

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Recommendations for additional reading will be made throughout the semester. Any material clearly identified as “recommended” or “optional” will not be tested.

The following works are recommended:

Schwartz, Barry (2016), The paradox of choice. New York:Ecco.

Kahneman, D. (2011) Thinking, fast and slow. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Levitt, S.D., and Dubner, S.J. (2009) Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. New York, NY:William Morrow Paperbacks.

Underhill, Paco (2008), Why we buy: the science of shopping. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Wansink, Brian (2007), Mindless eating: Why we eat more than we think. New York:Bantam.

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Online Support

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Moodle will be used to communicate with students. Some course material may be delivered online through Moodle; participation in online learning may replace some scheduled classroom time. Scores, course documents, announcements, and resources will be posted in Moodle. Students are advised to check the Moodle course site daily.

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Workload

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Each credit point represents approximately 10 hours of study time; this means that 10 hours x 15 points = 150 total learning hours.

According to university policy, 200/300-level 15-point papers should have an average of 3 hours of contact time per week (i.e., the total of class and tutorial meetings). Students are expected to attend two hours of lecture and one hour of tutorial per week. Tutorials will start in Week 3. In teaching weeks where there are no formal tutorial sessions, additional content or activities may be assigned for students to engage in self-directed study. Pay attention to announcements in class and on Moodle regarding class sessions and activities.

Students are expected to supplement in-class and tutorial learning opportunities with additional preparation hours such as reading, team meetings, project work, studying, and preparation of assignments/assessments. This paper requires approximately 110 additional preparation hours, which is a combination of pre-class readings, group meetings and preparation of formal assessments. The use of discussion forums is also encouraged, as these provide an opportunity to enhance learning and explore different viewpoints with your colleagues.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: MRKTG101 or MKTG151

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: MKTG255, MKTG355

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