MSYS221-17B (HAM)

Entrepreneurial Electronic Commerce

20 Points

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Waikato Management School
Te Raupapa
Department of Management Systems

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: lori.jervis@waikato.ac.nz
: quentin.somerville@waikato.ac.nz
: rebekah.crosswell@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

: gina.millar@waikato.ac.nz
: kaydi.o'connor-stratton@waikato.ac.nz

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jessica.howie@waikato.ac.nz
: helen.lynch@waikato.ac.nz
: clive.wilkinson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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Digital business (and electronic commerce) involves conducting business activities electronically. Information and communications technologies (such as, the internet, social media, mobile) have fundamentally altered the way in which business are planned, led, and executed. Using lectures, lab-based practical, individual projects, and assignments, this introductory paper covers all aspects associated with the ever-evolving field of digital business. Lectures provide an overview of digital business including key messages for entrepreneurial firms wishing to establish an online presence. The lab-based practical, project, and online discussion provide exposure to a number of digital business development opportunities. The paper is designed to deliver the following outcomes.

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Paper Structure

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MSYS121 offers a variety of learning experiences and assessments.

A two-hour lecture happens on Tuesday afternoons (3-5pm in ELT-G.01) and the lecture is also available on Panopto. An online discussion forum allows students the opportunity to comment on major questions that arise from the lecture topic. Two tests assess your understanding of this lecture-based learning.

Significant hands-on learning happens in small practical assignments taught in lab sessions and applied in an end-of-semester assignment. In 2015-16 post-paper evaluations, students described these practicals as useful, engaging, interesting and fun.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Define and describe fundamental concepts and types of digital business and e-commerce, with examples.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 2. Understand the emerging digital business technologies (such as social media, mobile, and robotics) and their impact on business.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 3. Recognise, identify, and explain critical issues surrounding managing digital business including strategies, policies, securities, and privacy.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 4. Apply basic digital business technical skills to web site design, social networks, web services and in building mobile applications.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • 5. Understand the use and societal consequences of digital technologies (e.g., digital divide, e-government, e-democracy, e-voting, e-learning).
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Test
It is a 60 minutes, closed book test conducted during the exam period (to be announced) and consists of short answer questions (16 marks) and multiple choice questions (6 marks). The content is based on lecture notes in weeks 2-11. The tests are made up of short answer (80%) and multiple choice (20%) questions.The rubric for marking short answer test questions follows. Although only a small part of test marking relates to articulation, it is important to write clearly and concisely. The main focus is on your understanding as per Learning Outcomes 1-3, focusing on clear understanding of concepts and being able to justify your answer by argument or example.

TEST Criteria050607080100

Articulation

Concisely and clearly written

Rambling, some irrelevancies and errors, incomplete statements

Reasonably succinct, simple and understandable

Succinct and poignant, clear and grammatically correct

Understanding

Mastery of concepts
(WHAT is this?)

Limited evidence of conceptual understanding, description often incorrect

Reasonable coverage of concepts, description not completely correct

Complete comprehension demonstrated,
description correct

Depth of argument, justification and illustration
(WHY is it this?)

List of points or sweeping statements without justification, not linked to practice or illustrated by examples

Relevant, reasoned argument, justified through practice and/or example

Points and statements fully address main question, comprehensive justification illustrated through appropriate evidence

Online Discussion

An important part of this paper will be your contribution to an online discussion forum which consists of eight discussion topics. Discussion questions will be posed in the same weeks as the practical (weeks 3-5 and 7-11). A new discussion question is posted on Monday morning and contributions to the discussion forum are due by 11:30pm Friday in the same week. Contributions made after the week has elapsed will receive a mark of zero. Each discussion is worth 3 points.

You should try and contribute to each topic within a few days of it being posted. A rubric similar to the test rubric is used, with two additional criteria relating to engagement. Of course, you should contribute in a way respectful of others. Therefore contributions which include personal attacks, vulgarity, profanity, defamation and posting offensive material will not be tolerated.

ONLINE DISCUSSION Criteria0 5060 7080 100

Articulation

Concisely and clearly written

Rambling, some irrelevancies and errors, incomplete statements

Reasonably succinct, simple and understandable

Succinct and poignant, clear and grammatically correct

Understanding

Mastery of concepts
(WHAT is it?)

Limited evidence of conceptual understanding, description often incorrect

Reasonable coverage of concepts, description not completely correct

Complete comprehension demonstrated,
description correct

Depth of argument, justification and illustration
(WHY is it this?)

List of points or sweeping statements without justification, not linked to practice or illustrated by examples

Relevant, reasoned argument, justified through practice and/or example

Points and statements fully address main question, comprehensive justification illustrated through appropriate evidence

Engagement

Relevance to the discussion topic

Posts do not relate to discussion content, makes short or irrelevant remarks, little insight provided, never refers to previous posts

Posts often relate to discussion content, prompts further discussion of topic, some reference to previous posts

Posts consistently relate to discussion content, relevant and insightful, usually references earlier posts

Contribution to the learning environment

Makes very little effort to participate in learning environment as it develops, seems uninterested

Frequently attempts to direct the discussion and to present relevant viewpoints for consideration by group, interacts freely

Aware of needs of class, frequently attempts to motivate the group discussion; presents creative approaches to topic

Individual Project
There is one individual assignment for this paper. This assignment allows the student to apply both theory and practice to a real-life situation. Details can be found on MyWeb under Files. All assignments are assessed for plagiarism using TurnItIn. This software can identify material that has been copied from the Internet, publications and similar assignments submitted for assessment at this and other institutions. You are advised to reference all material you take from other sources. The assignment specifies the marking criteria. More details are provided in class.

Computer Practicals
The technical content of the paper will be introduced through practical laboratory sessions involving hands-on computer work. The objective of the practicals is for you to attain a basic level of competency in designing and building Web sites, as well as learning about Google Sites, e-commerce applications, etc. There are eight computer practicals. Each practical will involve pre-practical reading and planning, along with practical activities and the completion of the practical hand-in sheet. You should expect to spend up to four hours on each practical. Each practical has its own specific marking guide, with a more general rubric as below. If you have any questions concerning the practicals, email the MSYS121 tutors.

PRACTICALS Criteria050 6070 80100

Articulation

Concisely and clearly written

Rambling, some irrelevancies and errors, incomplete statements

Reasonably succinct, simple and understandable

Succinct and poignant, clear and grammatically correct

Understanding

Mastery of concepts/ demonstration of technical skill
(WHAT is it?)

Limited evidence of conceptual understanding, description often incorrect, technical skill not demonstrated

Reasonable coverage of concepts, description not completely correct, some technical skill demonstrated

Complete comprehension shown, description correct, mastery of technical skill demonstrated

Evidence
(WHY is it this?)

No justification, not linked to practice or illustrated by examples

Some justification, some links to practice and/or illustrated through examples

Comprehensive justification illustrated through links to practice and/or examples

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 1:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. 8 Practicals
Average of All
6 Oct 2017
No set time
24
  • Online: MyWeb
2. HTML Basics*
4 Aug 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
3. Website Planning*
11 Aug 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
4. Revenue Models*
18 Aug 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
5. Application Basics*
25 Aug 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
6. Social Media Applications*
8 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
7. Website Design*
15 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
8. Web Development Services*
22 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
9. Google Sites
29 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: MyWeb
10. 8 Discussion Topics
Average of All
24
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
11. The rise of autonomous machines
28 Jul 2017
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
12. Cloud computing
4 Aug 2017
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
13. Innovative Internet Business Model
11 Aug 2017
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
14. Going Social
18 Aug 2017
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
15. Geo-targeting
1 Sep 2017
No set time
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
16. Internet of things
8 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
17. Social Media Security & Privacy Threats
15 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
18. Big Data Analytics
22 Sep 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
19. Individual Project
22 Oct 2017
9:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
20. Test
26 Sep 2017
4:00 PM
12
21. Case Study Analysis
Average of All
27 Oct 2017
No set time
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
22. Case Study 1
17 Jul 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
23. Case Study 2
31 Jul 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
24. Case Study 3
28 Aug 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
25. Case Study 4
2 Oct 2017
11:30 PM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Dave Chaffey, Digital Business and E-Commerce Management, Sixth Edition, ISBN-10: 0273786547, ISBN-13: 9780273786542, ©2015, Pearson, Paper, 712 pp. You will need to purchase a copy.

Other useful texts for this course include:

Farhoomand, A. Managing (e)business transformation: a global perspective, (Basingstoke; New York: Palgrave Macmillan Houndmills, 2004) [ISBN 9781403936042].

Schneider, G. Electronic commerce. (Boston, MA: Thomson Course Technology, 2010) ninth annual edition [ISBN 9780538469241].

Turban, E., J. Lee, D. King, T. Peng Liang and T. Turban Electronic commerce: a managerial perspective. (Upper Saddle River, NJ; London: Pearson Education, 2009) sixth edition [ISBN 9780137034659 (pbk)].

Khan G. F., 2015, seven layers of social media analytics: Mining business insights from social media text, actions, networks, hyperlinks, apps, search engine, and location data, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

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Recommended Readings

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In addition to the textbook, there are certain key articles associated with each chapter, which you should read:

Boyd, D.M. and N.B. Ellison ‘Social network sites: definition, history and scholarship’, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13 2008, pp.210−30.

Bughin, J., M. Chui and B. Johnson ‘The next step in open innovation’, The McKinsey Quarterly June 2008, pp.1−9.

Chu, C. and S. Smithson ‘E-business and organizational change: a structurational approach’, Information Systems Journal 17(4) 2007, pp.369−89.

Clegg, C.W., C. Chu et al. ‘Sociotechnical study of e-business: grappling with an octopus’, Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations 3(1) 2005, pp.53−71.

Cordella, A. ‘Transaction costs and information systems: does it add up?’, Journal of Information Technology 21(3) 2006, pp.195−202.

Howcroft, D. ‘After the goldrush: deconstructing the myths of the dot.com market’, Journal of Information Technology 16(4) 2001, pp.195−204.

Kasper-Fuehrer, E.C. and N.M. Ashkanasy ‘The interorganizational virtual organization’, International Studies of Management and Organization 33(4) 2004, pp.34−64.

Lee, H.L. ‘Aligning supply chain strategies with product uncertainties’, California Management Review 44(3) 2002, pp.105−19.

Lee, H.L., V. Padmanabhan and S. Whang ‘The bullwhip effect in supply chains’, Sloan Management Review 38(3) 1997, pp.93−102.

Ljungberg, J. ‘Open source movements as a model for organizing’, European Journal of Information Systems 9 2000, pp.208−16.

Lohse, G.L. and P. Spiller ‘Electronic shopping’, Communications of the ACM 41(7) 1998, pp.81−87.

Malone, T.W., J. Yates and R.I. Benjamin ‘Electronic markets and electronic hierarchies’, Communications of the ACM 30(6) 1987, pp.484−97.

O’Reilly, T. ‘What is web 2.0: design patterns and business models for the next generation of software’, Communications and Strategies, First Quarter 2007, pp.17−37. Available online: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1008839

Picot, A., C. Bortenlanger and H. Rohrl ‘The organization of electronic markets: contributions from the new institutional economics’, Information Society 13(1) 1997, pp.107–23.

Riggins, F.J. ‘A framework for identifying web-based electronic commerce opportunities’, Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce 9(4) 1999, pp.297−310.

Riggins, F. J. and S. Mitra ‘An e-valuation framework for developing netenabled business metrics through functionality interaction’, Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, 17(2) 2007, pp.175−203.

Sull, D. and S. Turconi ‘Fast fashion lessons’, Business Strategy Review 19(2) 2008, pp.5−11.

Jesse Fox, Jennifer J. Moreland, The dark side of social networking sites: An exploration of the relational and psychological stressors associated with Facebook use and affordances, Computers in Human Behavior, Volume 45, April 2015, Pages 168-176, ISSN 0747-5632, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.083

Eric Allen, Jerry Fjermestad, (2001) "E‐commerce marketing strategies: an integrated framework and case analysis", Logistics Information Management, Vol. 14 Iss: 1/2, pp.14 – 23

Boying Li, Eugene Ch’ng, Alain Yee-Loong Chong, Haijun Bao, Predicting online e-marketplace sales performances: A big data approach, Computers & Industrial Engineering, Volume 101, November 2016, Pages 565-571, ISSN 0360-8352, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.08.009.

Khan G. F., 2015, seven layers of social media analytics: Mining business insights from social media text, actions, networks, hyperlinks, apps, search engine, and location data, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Antonio Ghezzi, Manos Dramitinos, Towards a Future Internet infrastructure: Analyzing the multidimensional impacts of assured quality Internet interconnection, Telematics and Informatics, Volume 33, Issue 2, May 2016, Pages 613-630, ISSN 0736-5853, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2015.10.003.

Randy Bean, 2017, Companies Brace for Decade of Disruption From AI, http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/companies-brace-for-decade-of-disruption-from-ai/?utm_source=Publicaster&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DA+1%2f31%2f17+-+Flood+of+Data&utm_content=the+single+most+disruptive

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Other Resources

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You should make a habit of regularly consulting weekly and monthly journals and newspapers so as to ‘keep up’ with trends in the area. Most broadsheet or business newspapers, such as the Financial Times or the Wall Street Journal, have regular e-business articles. Among the best-known publications are the following:

  • Harvard Business Review (https://hbr.org/): HBR also run a magazine which contains interesting articles on business.
  • The Economist (www.economist.com). Athough this is not a computer magazine, it does contain regular articles on aspects of e-business
  • E-commerce Times (www.ecommercetimes.com)
  • Financial Times Digital Business (www.ft.com/technology/digitalbusiness)
  • Wired Magazine (www.wired.com).
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Online Support

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MyWeb is a learning management system provided by the Waikato Management School. MyWeb offers links to a variety of resources (e.g., lecture slides, instructions for practical assignments, Panopto) students will need to successfully complete this paper.
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Workload

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As a 15-point paper, expected workload is 150 hours during the semester. This is composed of attendance at lectures, study for and attendance at tests, preparation for and attendance at practical workshops, participation in discussion forums and preparation of and submitting the end-of-semester assignment.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

MSYS121

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