PACIS201-21A (HAM)

Pacific Texts

15 Points

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: hinerangi.kara@waikato.ac.nz
: ritane.wallace@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper explores the diverse written, film, media and online texts of the Pacific region. The main focus is on contemporary texts; these will be contextualised by an examination of traditional Pacific textual forms and the histories of textual production in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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Paper Structure

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We will meet twice a week for this paper. On Mondays we will have a two hour lecture session (2-4pm) and on Thursdays we will have a two hour workshop (12-1pm). Some of the class sessions will be field trips - information about these will be clearly given in class and via Moodle.

Each week a Pacific film or documentary will be screened outside of these times. Although these are not compulsory, I encourage you to attend these two hour sessions. In the first week of class we will decide together on the best time for these screenings.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • discuss the key features of texts produced by Pacific people based in New Zealand, elsewhere in the Pacific region, and in other diasporic sites.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • articulate the central arguments of Pacific textual criticism, including the place of textual analysis within the fields of Pacific Studies and (Anglophone) literary, cultural and film studies.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • critically consider specific texts by Pacific people, and contextualise these texts through an understanding of relevant literary traditions, histories of interaction and colonisation, and the politics of publication and anthologising in the region.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. A Pacific textual tradition
15 Mar 2021
2:00 PM
25
  • Presentation: In Class
2. Critical analysis
8 Apr 2021
11:00 AM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Wikipedia entry
24 May 2021
2:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Workshop
4. Essay
3 Jun 2021
11:00 AM
35
  • Hand-in: In Workshop
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Chantal Spitz. Island of Shattered Dreams. Wellington: Huia, 2007. (This is the translation from French into English by Jean Anderson.)
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Online Support

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This paper is supported by Moodle. Moodle is the eLearning platform of this university that is used to foster student interaction related to learning. This paper (PACIS201-21A(HAM)) can be accessed by visiting http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz/’

On our Moodle site you will find resources, links to readings, and further information about assessment.

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Workload

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As a 15 point paper, you should spend 150 hours working on this paper across the semester. This includes contact time (12 weeks x 4 hours of lecture/ workshop), preparation for class each week (readings, making notes), and work on assessment tasks.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper can be taken as an elective, as part of a major or minor in Pacific & Indigenous Studies, or as part of a major or minor in Māori & Indigenous Studies.

PACIS201is the fourth PACIS paper after PACIS100, PACIS200 and PACIS300. Please note that you can take these four papers to get a minor in PACIS, but there are also papers related to the Pacific offered by other subjects that can also be included in a PACIS minor or major.

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