PHIL250-16A (HAM)

Knowledge and Reality

20 Points

Edit Header Content
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Te Kura Kete Aronui
School of Social Sciences
Philosophy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenors

Lecturers

Administrators

Tutors

Student Representatives

Librarians

Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

This paper is designed around the two main topics of knowledge and reality. We shall be addressing two main questions: What is there? How do we know? The course will combine historical presentation of questions about knowledge and reality with contemporary approaches. There will be a particular focus on the British Empiricists Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. As part of investigating the two main questions listed above, we will consider questions such as the following:


  • What is knowledge?
  • What counts as real?
  • What sorts of things exist?
  • Can there be knowledge of anything?

  • What is the role of perception in our understanding of reality?
  • Are we justified in believing the sun will rise tomorrow?

Students will become familiar with some common philosophical problems regarding these issues, and will learn how to construct and assess arguments concerning them.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

Students will attend three 50 minute lectures and one 50 minute tutorial a week.

15% of the course mark will be for class participation, including attendance, participation and completing tutorial exercises in advance of the tutorial sessions.

Students should sign up for a tutorial on the course Moodle page. Tutorials will begin on Friday of the first week.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • To examine important philosophical issues as they are presented in historically significant texts
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • To develop an ability to use the tools of philosophy in evaluating these texts
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • To develop an ability to clearly and persuasively express both your own philosophical opinions and your arguments for those opinions
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content
This is a 200-level university level paper and the amount of assigned work reflects that fact. The student should keep up with the readings and should attend all lectures and at least one tutorial per week. If the student fails to understand something either in the reading or in class, then the student should ask questions of the Convenor, Lecturer, or Tutor.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Internally Assessed Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:2. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 40% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:2 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 40% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of internal markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Class participation
25
2. Essay One
4 Apr 2016
11:00 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Essay Two
30 May 2016
11:00 PM
50
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Internal Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
Required readings not hyperlinked in the schedule of readings above will be made available through Moodle.
Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

There are many fine resources available on the topics of knowledge and reality, and you're welcome to check in with us if the following introductory books do not suit your fine-grained interests.

  1. Garrett, Brian. 2011. What Is This Thing Called Metaphysics? (2d ed) Oxford: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-6722-2.
  2. Goldman, Alvin and Matthew McGrath. 2015. Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-998112-0.
Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content

Course information will be regularly updated on the course Moodle page. This is also where you should access tutorial sign-up, and the tutorial preparation exercises. The course outline, required reading, and lecture schedule will be published here, as will the presentation and essay topics when they become available. Students are expected to check the Moodle page regularly for communications about the course. Essays will be submitted and returned through Moodle.

Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content

The workload for this paper is 10 hour per week .

Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content
Philosophy is the very crucible from which all other disciplines evolved, so this paper links with every other paper in the offing at university.
Edit Linkages Content