PHIL350-16B (HAM)

Recent Analytical Philosophy

20 Points

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Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Te Kura Kete Aronui
School of Social Sciences
Philosophy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: socisec2@waikato.ac.nz

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Librarian(s)

: hmorrell@waikato.ac.nz
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Paper Description

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This paper describes the birth, development and contestation of the analytic tradition in Philosophy starting at the end of the nineteenth century and through the greater part of the twentieth century. This tradition is very much alive today. A leading theme is the way in which philosophical problems became refocussed by turning our attention to the nature of language. Key questions include: What is meaning? What is truth? What is the relationship between language and thought? What is the role of language in human life?

It is helpful to see the paper as consisting of two halves, the first six weeks and the second six weeks, which will be taught by different lecturers. The first half begins by presenting a 'received view' of language in a widely-held 'correspondence theory of truth'. It then moves to two major challenges to that received view: in the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the pragmatist tradition. In the second half, we will look at further challenges to assumptions about how language reflects the nature of the world, whether our best theory of meaning is reflected in the use of language, and consider whether our semantic theory should be constructed out of material validity and incompatibility rather than reference, truth, and satisfaction.

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Paper Structure

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The paper is taught through two 2-hour lecture-discussions per week, Mondays 11 - 1 pm in A.G.12 and Fridays 2 – 4 pm in IG1.08. Regular attendance is important to maintain a sense of the continuing story and to build an intellectual community around the paper.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • be in possession of an intellectual framework which will support understanding of work in this tradition.
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  • have in-depth knowledge of some work of several of the key authors in this tradition
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  • have enhanced skills in engaging orally in an intelligent and critical manner with the kind of abstract themes encountered in this paper
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  • have enhanced skills in writing philosophical essays on challenging topics
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Assessment

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Each piece of assessment has been designed to enable students to demonstrate their grasp of essential concepts and techniques at progressive stages of the paper and for teaching staff to assess the progress they are making and to adjust lecture plans if necessary.
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Internally Assessed Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:2. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 40% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:2 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 40% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of internal markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Essay 1
28 Aug 2016
11:30 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Essay 2
30 Sep 2016
11:30 PM
32
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Class participation
17
4. In-class test
5 Aug 2016
2:00 PM
17
  • In Class: In Lecture
5. Tutorial Presentation
9
Internal Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations (Blackwell)

Readings listed in Paper Outline

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Recommended Readings

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Recommended readings will be made available through Moodle.
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Online Support

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There is a Moodle page for the paper accessible to all enrolled students. This contains copies of powerpoint slides, reading and other information.

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Workload

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There are four contact hours per teaching week. The normal expectation of the total time required for the whole paper is 200 hours.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

PHIL102 or PHIL103

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

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