PHILO102-19B (HAM)

Introduction to Logic

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Philosophy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

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: paula.maynard@waikato.ac.nz

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: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper is an introduction to formal logic. It teaches you to identify and analyze the logical form of deductive arguments via precise definitions of the concepts of validity, invalidity, consistency, inconsistency, tautology and contradiction, in both propositional and predicate logic. It presents systematic formal methods which may be used to prove arguments valid (or not) in both systems of logic.

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Paper Structure

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In the first four weeks of the paper you will be introduced to propositional logic, and how to use truth tables to solve problems in propositional logic. In weeks five to eight you will learn how to solve propositional logic problems using truth trees, and be introduced to predicate logic. The final part of the course will contain more complex predicate logic problems, including how to do truth trees in predicate logic.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • gain practice in identifying the logical form underlying arguments made in ordinary language (e.g. English)
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  • learn what the concept of “a valid argument” really means
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  • learn to identify valid and invalid arguments in a structured and systematic way
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  • gain an “intellectual workout” which strengthens the analytical part of the mind. This is something which is very useful for studying any subject.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Internal Assessment/Examination Ratio 1:0

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Weekly exercises
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Pre-test quizzes
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Test 1
29 Jul 2019
1:00 PM
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Test 2
9 Sep 2019
1:00 PM
25
  • In Class: In Lecture
5. Test 3
10 Oct 2019
1:00 PM
25
  • In Class: In Lecture
6. Tutorial Attendance and Participation
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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There is no required textbook purchase for this paper. A textbook will be available on Moodle.

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Recommended Readings

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Rod Girle, Introduction to Logic, second edition (Pearson 2008) is a recommended text. Bennetts likely has some copies, and there are many second hand copies around, as this used to be a required text. It has very useful running exercises.

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Online Support

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Class announcements and lecture notes will be posted on Moodle. Students should check the course Moodle page regularly.

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Workload

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The total workload for this paper is 150 hours. That is 10 hours a week, including class time.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PHIL102

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