PHILO106-21A (NET)

Social and Moral Philosophy

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Philosophy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: monique.mulder@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

This course is an introduction to Practical Ethics, which is the use of philosophical tools, including moral principles, moral theories, and moral reasoning to understand and discuss contemporary social and moral issues. The course will introduce you to these tools as we examine a number of contemporary social and moral issues, such as euthanasia, animal welfare, and freedom of expression.

The point of this course is not to convince you that you should think this or that about the issue we are discussing. Instead the course aims to provide you with the tools and assistance you need in order to formulate your own well-reasoned responses to these issues. You will be evaluated on how well you understand the underlying moral issues and how well you are able to argue about them. Thus, it is possible (and often happens) that two people that take opposing positions on almost every issue can both receive high grades.

The job of the teaching staff in the various assignments and forum discussions is to stimulate your thinking by asking you to defend your views against critical questions (this is called the Socratic Method and is almost as old as philosophy itself). Please understand that criticizing a view is not the same as criticizing a person. Socrates said: "I am one of those who are willing to be refuted if I say anything which is not true, and willing to refute anyone else who says what is not true, and just as happy to be refuted as to refute." The main point here is that if, above all, we seek the truth, then being proven wrong is a blessing because it moves us closer to the truth (or at least further away from falsehoods). So, we should seek to prove others wrong, and be proven wrong ourselves. Everyone who values truth benefits from frank, open, and respectful discussion on important issues. Criticizing people will not be allowed, but criticizing ideas will be encouraged.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

You will engage with this course through Moodle. You are expected to complete the lessons, do the set reading, and participate in the forum discussions.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Overall
    Students who have successfully completed the course will be able to effectively utilise the tools, concepts and theories of applied ethics in their thought and practice.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Knowledge Acquisition
    Students will have acquired knowledge about moral principles, how to argue morally, and contemporary social and moral issues, including: moral relativism, the Divine Command Theory, euthanasia, abortion, genetic enhancement, the ethics of faith, animal welfare, our obligations to the poor, criminal justice, and freedom of expression.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Critical Reasoning
    A student completing the course will be able to reason critically about the topics discussed in the course, and be able to defend their answers on these issues against critical questioning.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Expression
    A student completing the course will be able to formulate his or her own views about the issues discussed throughout the course, both in discussion (forums) and through essays. This requires being able to clearly state positions and argue for and against them in a generally compelling way.
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

Essays are to be submitted via Moodle. Every effort will be made to return marked essays (via Moodle) within 14 days after the due date. Essays will certainly be returned before 21 days after the due date. You will be informed if there is any delay.

No piece of work is compulsory, but in practice you will need to complete all assigned tasks to get a good grade.

Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Lessons
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Forum participation
15
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
3. Quizzes
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Essay 1
16 Apr 2021
11:30 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Essay 2
11 Jun 2021
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
All required readings for this course will be accessible through the Moodle page. Please note that the required readings are the minimum reading needed to prepare for the quizzes.
Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Time permitting, it should be helpful to access some of the recommended resources (podcasts, videos, and readings). These are also available on the Moodle page.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content

All relevant material, including readings, lecture slides (and recordings of the lectures), and tutorial worksheets will be made available through Moodle.

Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content

There are 2 1-hour Lectures for this course, as detailed above. In addition, students are required to complete the Moodle forum discussions each week.

Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

If you enjoy this paper, you should consider enrolling in:

  • PHILO150: The Big Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy (HAM and TGA)
  • ARTSC103: Rights and Reasons (HAM)
  • PHILO103: Critical Thinking (NET)
  • PHILO102: Introduction to Logic (HAM)
  • PHILO103: Critical Thinking (NET)
  • PHILO215: Moral and Political Philosophy
  • PHILO225: Happiness and Wellbeing
  • PHILO217: Ethics at Work
  • PHILO218: Environmental Ethics.
Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PHIL106

Edit Linkages Content