POLCY212-19B (HAM)

Power, Politics and Policy Analysis

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

The aim of this paper is to help you to see how politics and policy is a part of our everyday lives and to give you some tools to critically engage in that world. Politics is seen as a struggle between competing advocates who try to get us to view the world as they do, working within a context that is shaped by cultural ideas and institutions.

Over the course we will examine the following questions: Why do some issues become recognised by the government as worthy of attention and others fail to receive any attention? Why are some arguments more persuasive than others within this process? Why do we end up with the policies that we do? Do we ever manage to ‘solve’ problems through policy, and how would we know if we did? What drives to policy change?

We begin the course by providing a framework for studying politics and policy in New Zealand before examining eight current policy issues: alcohol, firearms, hate speech in online environments, child poverty, capital gains tax, climate change, freshwater, and euthanasia. We conclude by reflecting on questions around ‘government for the public good’.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content
The paper will involve Moodle-based reading and the completion of online lessons, along with lectures and workshops where you will have the chance to ask questions and get clarification as you complete your written papers. The final two weeks will involve in-class student-led presentations.
Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Acquire an extensive knowledge of public policy in New Zealand;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Identify the political dimensions of range of contemporary policy issues;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand and analyse the role of political arguments within these issues;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop the ability to think critically about politics and policy;
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Improve written and oral presentation skills.
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content
The Lessons and Class-based Activities are worth a large proportion of your total grade in this course. These activities will require you to keep up with reading assignments each week, and complete the lessons that are embedded within those assignments, as well as coming to class and engaging in the activities associated with these.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Moodle-based Lessons
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Essay 1
16 Aug 2019
12:00 AM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Class-based Activities
25
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Essay 2
11 Oct 2019
4:00 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
Your readings will be available through Moodle and each week you will be ask to read a combination of 1) case-based material on policy related to alcohol, firearms, hate speech in online environments, child poverty, capital gains tax, climate change, freshwater, and euthanasia, and 2) material that introduces you to theories of power, politics and the policy process. There will also be a list of supplemental readings for each week, and you should be able to gain access to most of this online.
Edit Required Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
All readings and other course related material is provided via Moodle.
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
The work for this course involves completing Moddle-based readings and lesson, attending lectures, participating in workshops and other class-based activities, and completing the two essays. Expected workload for the paper is an average of about 14 hours per week.
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: POLS212

Edit Linkages Content