POLSC102-20B (HAM)

New Zealand Politics and Policy

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content
This course introduces you to democracy, government and policy making in New Zealand. It begins by looking at the key institutions of government - cabinet, parliament and the judiciary - and examines the role and function of each. It covers elections and the role of interest groups and lobbyists in influencing government decisions, as well as the capacity for citizens to be involved. It thus provides a foundation for understanding how democracy in New Zealand works, and how it influences policies in areas such as international affairs, environmental policy, Maori development, and in social policy areas such as health care and housing. Policy making in these areas is political, and the course will help you to begin to understand these politics. Why is it that some problems attract government attention, and why are some solutions adopted while others are not? In examining these types of questions, the paper prepares you for the further study of politics and public policy.
Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

The paper will involve Moodle-based reading and the completion of online lessons, along with tutorials where you will have the chance to discuss the course material, ask questions and get clarification as you complete your written papers.

You should sign up for one of the six weekly tutorial times using My Papers ‘Event Activity Signup’ in iWaikato for this paper. Tutorials start in Week 2 of the semester.

As well as Moodle-based reading and the completion of online lessons, course work for this paper includes weekly reading commentaries, two essays, and one online test.

To access Moodle you will need to log onto iWaikato and follow the link under ‘Key Links’, or go to elearn.waikato.ac.nz.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Identify and describe the key institutions of government in New Zealand
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Describe the role of these institutions in government decision making
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Discuss the links between the policy cycle and government decision making in New Zealand
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Recognise and discuss contemporary political and policy issues in New Zealand
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Critically evaluate media portrayals of political and policy issues
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand the fundamentally political nature of policy making
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content
You are responsible for completing the Moodle lessons and reading the assigned material BEFORE coming to the tutorials. You are also responsible for keeping up with national policy debates through various media.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Weekly Moodle Lessons
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Weekly commentaries
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Your Political World paper
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Online Test
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Essay Proposal
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Essay
16 Oct 2020
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
Shaw, R. and Eichbaum, C. 2011. Public Policy in New Zealand: Institutions, processes and outcomes (3rd edition), Auckland: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Hayward, J., ed. 2015. New Zealand Government and Politics (6th Edition). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.

This is a very good introduction to New Zealand government and public policy and has relevance to a variety of disciplines. We will be drawing on this throughout the course. It is well worth having on your bookshelf.

Stone, Deborah. 1997. Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making. New York: W.W. Norton.

The 2002 and 2012 revised editions are equally recommended.

Miller, R. 2015. Democracy in New Zealand. Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Other Resources

Edit Other Resources Content

The following is a list of journals (available on the Library website) that may be useful to you:

Policy Quarterly (a New Zealand publication)

Public Administration

Journal of Public Policy

Policy Sciences

Policy Studies Journal

Australian Journal of Public Administration

Governance

Edit Other Resources Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
The teaching of this paper is supported online using Moodle. To access Moodle you will need to log onto iWaikato and follow the link under ‘Key Links’ or go to elearn.waikato.ac.nz.
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
As well as lecture and tutorial attendance, course work for this paper includes weekly assignments, two essays, and two tests. The expected workload for this paper is an average of about 14 hours per week.
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: POLS105

Edit Linkages Content