POLSC201-20A (NET)

Modern Political Thinkers

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
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    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to examine the major developments of European political thought with a focus on the ideas of a number of political thinkers in the modern era: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, and Marx. We begin with a brief introduction of the social transformations in the widely divergent historical contexts in Italy, England, France and Germany exploring the processes of social change that characterized modern foundations of political thought. After politicizing the terrains of engagement of modern political thinkers, attention turns to contextualize their political thought in their own historical setting. The objectives of the course are to introduce students to the history of political ideas in the Western political tradition from 1500-1900 and to offer them an interdisciplinary method to critically consider political theory in relation to social change in different historical contexts.
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Paper Structure

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This NET paper is taught through lectures on Moodle and a forum on Moodle for each theorist. The forums are intended primarily for discussion of the ideas and arguments presented in the lectures and reading. They are intended to provide an opportunity for students to improve the important skills of developing and expressing their own ideas.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • understand some of the principal concerns of modern political theorists;
    • understand their ideas, arguments, and the methods of theorising employed;
    • engage critically with the works of major thinkers.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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There are twelve pieces of assessment for twelve weeks:

six engagement exercises (%36),

four quote reviews (%24),

and two comparative essays (%20 each).

Students are expected to complete engagement exercises about the content of presentations each week, which are on Moodle. Engagement exercises will be multiple-choice questions (each %1) to be completed in the given time period after watching the lecture presentation. In addition to these, each week there will be quote reviews that all students are expected to post a comment (500 words) at -least four weeks out of six -regarding the quote given that week (each %6). In the middle (week III) and the last parts (week VI) of the paper, students must choose one of the essay questions and write a 2000-word comparative essay, briefly comparing and contrasting the thinkers and/or some key concepts. Comparative essay questions will be posted to Moodle for students to choose and plan their essays. Those who require help to plan their essays and develop their arguments can use the office hours to get feedback and further help before final submissions.

All of the assessments are required to be completed online in Moodle and every submission will be processed through Turnitin Plagiarism Detection. Students must be careful about the sources they use while quoting and citing. Long citations and quotations will not be counted inside the word limits while grading the submissions. More on how to cite the material to be used can be found in UoW Library Reference Style Guide.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Engagement exercise 1
15 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
2. Quotation Review 1
15 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Engagement exercise 2
29 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
4. Quotation Review 2
29 Mar 2020
11:30 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Engagement exercise 3
12 Apr 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
6. Quotation Review 3
12 Apr 2020
11:30 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Comparative Essay 1
3 May 2020
11:30 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Engagement exercise 4
10 May 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
9. Quotation Review 4
10 May 2020
11:30 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
10. Engagement exercise 5
17 May 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
11. Quotation Review 5
18 May 2020
11:30 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
12. Engagement exercise 6
25 May 2020
11:30 PM
6
  • Online: Upload to Moodle Forum
13. Quotation Review 6
1 Jun 2020
4:00 PM
4
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
14. Comparative Essay II
5 Jun 2020
11:30 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Required readings are avalable on Moodle. They consist of extracts from the works of each theorist.
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Recommended Readings

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The Reading List contains many works on each theorist, many of them digitized and available to be read on-line. Students are welcomed to use Recommended Readings for their essays. Quote Reviews are based on Primary Sources (Required Readings) and Recommended Readings.
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Online Support

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Lectures, lecture notes and extracts are available on Moodle and Panopto. Many works on the Reading List are digitised and available on-line.
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Workload

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The expected workload for this paper is 14 hours per week. There is work to be submitted every week.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: POLS201

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