POLSC211-19A (HAM)

Political Systems around the World

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

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Paper Description

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The principle dynamics of the politics of major world regions, including Europe, North America, Latin America, Australasia, East Asia, South and Central Asia, the Middle East, the Pacific, Europe, Africa; major periodicals (such as the Economist, and Foreign Affairs) with an of analysis of the conceptual bases, background and presumptions of articles dealing with the political systems of the world.
The reigning paradigms of comparative politics; prevailing ideologies and ideological determinants; major paradigms in the development of post-Cold War political patterns, including authoritarianism, democracy and democratisation; familiarity with the major related data and literature; familiarity with the most prominent literature on the broad area of comparative politics.
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Paper Structure

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This paper is taught in two one-hour lectures, with participation in one tutorial per week expected. Students should sign up for one of the tutorial times using the button in Topic 2 of the Moodle site for this paper. Tutorials will start in the second week of the semester. The Tutor will be Brent Commerer. Attendance at lectures and tutorials is strongly advised, particularly since the short answer test will be based on material covered in these classes as well as the text.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts used in examining and comparing the politics and governments of different nations
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  • Understand approaches that make our comparisons more systematic and reliable
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  • Understand the political systems and institutions of government of a number of countries
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  • Recognise the distinctions between Authoritarianism and democracy
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  • Identify the global processes of development and modernization
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  • Understand the stages and pitfalls in transitions from authoritarian to democratic regimes
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Internal assessment/examination ratio: 1:0

  • First 2 tests: 15% each
  • Last test: 20%
  • Five Pre-announced Discussion quizzes (in class--the top 4 are averaged): 20%
  • 7-9 page essay from a list of topics (provided): 15%
  • Participation in tutorials (one tutorial per week): 15%
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Test 1
20 Mar 2019
3:00 PM
15
  • In Class: In Lecture
2. Test 2
1 May 2019
3:00 PM
15
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
3. Last test
11 Jun 2019
4:00 PM
20
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
4. Discussion quizzes (in classes)
20
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
5. Participation in tutorials
15
6. 7-9 page Essay, from list of topics (provided)
14 Jun 2019
4:00 PM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Hague, R., M. Harrop, and McCormick, J. 2016. Comparative Government and Politics: AnIntroduction, 10thed. Basingstoke: Palgrave. (available in Bennetts and in two hour reserve in the Library)

Samuel P. Huntington, “Clash of Civilisations,”For. Affairs, 72 (3) 1993 (available electronically from the Library).

and other readings to be assigned during the semester on the Moodle page.

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Online Support

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A moodle page for this paper has been created and is available to all registered students. It will have power point lecture slides, list all pre-announced quizzes and other additional readings, and will provide study guides for upcoming tests.
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Workload

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The expected workload for the paper is an average of about 12-14 hours per week.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: POLS211

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