POLSC300-19T (NET)

Religion and Political Violence

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
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    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This course in the history of political ideas examines Christian thought on political violence over the past 2000 years. It aims to give students a knowledge of the issues that political violence raises for a religion such as Christianity and the many and varied approaches to them. It does this by examining the writings of major Christian thinkers including Augustine, Aquinas, Luther and Calvin
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Paper Structure

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This NET paper is taught using resources provided to students in a course-book, the chapters of which will be available via the Moodle page, and digitised readings available on-line from the library. A forum will be available on Moodle for each topic on which students are encouraged to post comments, questions (to Kerry or to each other) and feedback.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • more clearly
    • understand the issues that political authority and violence raise for the Christian religion,
    • understand the principal concerns of political thinkers in the Christian tradition,
    • understand the ideas, arguments and methods of theorising employed by these thinkers,
    • engage critically with the works of major thinkers and to be able to explain their arguments, and
    • provide a critical assessment of these thinkers' arguments in a coherent, structured, and informed manner.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Students submit fourteen pieces of assessment: thirteen Reading Exercises and one Final Exercise. These total 6500 words.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Reading Exercises - first three
22 Nov 2019
4:00 PM
21
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Reading Exercises - 4 and 5
29 Nov 2019
4:00 PM
14
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Reading Exercises - 6, 7 and 8
6 Dec 2019
4:00 PM
21
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Reading Exercises 9, 10 and 11
13 Dec 2019
4:00 PM
21
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Reading Exercises 12, 13 and Final Exercise
16 Dec 2019
11:30 PM
23
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Readings for the Exercises are to be found after each chapter in the course-book, and all chapters will be available digitally from the Moodle page for the paper. Additional readings for each topic will be available digitally from the Library.
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Online Support

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Readings for the Exercises are in the course-book. Additional readings are available digitally from the Library. A forum for each topic will allow students to post questions, comments and feedback on-line.
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Workload

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The expected workload for the 15-point paper is 150 hours - which is an average of about 25 hours per week.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: POLS300

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