PSYC206-16A (HAM)

Animal Behaviour: Principles and Applications

20 Points

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Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Te Kura Kete Aronui
School of Psychology

Staff

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Paper Description

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Contributing Lecturers
Dr Jim Webster, AgResearch

Dr Cheryl O’Connor, AgResearch

Dr Gosia Zobel, AgResearch

The ‘Contact’ folder at the top of the PSYC206/304 Moodle page is the preferred method for students to contact staff. Staff will be available for discussion with students primarily via Moodle. If you need to see a member of staff please make an appointment via Moodle.

The main aim of the course is for students to gain an understanding of the causes and function of behaviour with primary reference to farm and other domestic animals. There will be a strong emphasis on understanding the determinants of animal welfare. This course provides material that is complementary to that in the third year course, Advanced Animal Behaviour, in the Department of Biological Sciences.

The overall objective of this paper is to enable you to know why and how animals behave the way they do in their day to day lives, both with others of their own species and with humans.

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Paper Structure

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Some lectures will be replaced by tests (see the lecture schedule). Viewing of all lectures and is strongly recommended in order to succeed in the course.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • use credible methodologies for observing, recording and reporting on animal behaviour
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  • develop, discuss and critique your own ideas and those of others in the scientific literature
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  • understand factors that influence welfare of animals
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  • discuss ethical considerations related to animal production
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  • synthesise diverse scientific information in the development of a coherent understanding of topical issues in animal behaviour.
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Assessment

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Assessment will consist of two tests. Attending both tests is highly recommended. They are closed-book tests.
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Internally Assessed Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:1. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 25% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 3:1 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 25% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of internal markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Test 1
50
2. Test 2
50
Internal Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Required readings will be provided on Moodle.
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Online Support

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Instructions and materials given during lectures or on Moodle are considered to be given to the whole class. Important information is posted on Moodle, so please ensure you check here regularly and that your contact details on Moodle (particularly your email address) are correct.

Other information of importance to all students which can be accessed via Moodle and from Psych Café (under forms and guides):

  • Request for Extensions form
  • Kaupapa Maori in Psychology Policy
  • General guide for psychology students
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Workload

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The amount of work expected of a typical student in a 20 point undergraduate paper (offered over one semester) is approximately 12 hours per week, including class contact time. These figures are approximations only, as papers vary in their requirements and students vary in both the amount of effort required and the level of grades they wish to achieve.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

PSYC304

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