PSYCH314-21B (HAM)

Behaviour Analysis

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Psychology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This course is intended to give students an introduction to the philosophy of behaviourism, to the experimental methods used in the study of behaviour and learning, and to the application of behavioural principles for helping with behaviour change.

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Paper Structure

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There are no live lectures for this course. Instead, you will work through weekly online workshops, complete readings and quizzes, and watch short recorded lectures. Every week, there will be a live Zoom hour every Wednesday from 10 - 11am where we can discuss topics in more depth.

There is one 1-hr laboratory class per week. You can choose to attend a laboratory class face-to-face or via Zoom.You will select a permanent laboratory time through Moodle during the first week of semester. For your laboratory exercises, you will conduct a self-management intervention, where you are your own participant.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Conduct basic research and data analysis for study of nonhuman and human behaviour

    The laboratory exercises are intended to give students direct experience with human behaviour experimentation and data collection and to give them the opportunity to learn to analyse and present research.

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Describe and understand fundamentals of behavioural research and treatment

    The course provides preparation for working with human and nonhuman behaviour change and problem behaviours and should prepare students to read and comprehend journal articles in the areas studied. The principles covered in this course serve as important background for those wishing to understand behavioural approaches to treatment and addressing behavioural deficits and excesses.

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Enter into postgraduate study in behaviour analysis

    By the end of the course, students who perform well in this paper should be prepared to enter the graduate papers which follow from this course and which are part of the BSocSc(Hons) PGDip(Psych) or MAppPsy(Behaviour Analysis) degrees.

    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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This course will be assessed internally via three course work tasks: Two tests, and lab assignments.

Course Credits for Research Participation

Up to 4% course credit can be obtained by participating in research undertaken by students or staff of the University of Waikato or by completing a text-based research exercise. These course credits cannot be used to change your overall grade from a fail to a pass, but may be used to increase your grade, for example, from a B to a B+. Relevant projects are advertised on Psych Café (under Research Participation).

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Lab Assignments
50
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Test 1
20 Aug 2021
No set time
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Test 2
15 Oct 2021
No set time
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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The required textbook is also used in graduate study courses in Behaviour Analysis. It is available as an e-book from the University of Waikato library. Content from the recommended texts and other sources may also be used. Recommended texts will be available on course reserve at the library and parts may be available on Moodle.

Required text

Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (2020). Applied behavior analysis (3rd ed.). Pearson.

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Recommended Readings

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  • Baum, W.M. (2017). Understanding behaviorism: Behavior, culture and evolution (3rd ed). Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Mayer, G. R., Sulzer-Azaroff, B., & Wallace, M. (2019). Behavior analysis for lasting change. Sloan Publishing.
  • Martin, G., & Pear, J. (2015). Behavior modification: What it is and how to do it (10th ed.). Pearson Education.
  • Pierce, W. D, & Cheney, C. D. (2017). Behavior analysis and learning (6th ed.). Taylor & Francis.
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Online Support

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Online support is available from the teaching assistant, lab instructors, and convener through Private Help on Moodle.

A range of links and resources have been made available on Moodle.

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Workload

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The amount of work expected of a typical student in a full undergraduate paper (offered over one semester) is approximately 12 hours per week, including class contact time. These figures are only approximations, as papers vary in their requirements and students vary in both the amount of effort required and the level of grades they wish to achieve.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: PSYCH204 or PSYC225 and PSYCH211 or PSYC208 or equivalent.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PSYC314

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