PSYCH511-22A (HAM)

Evaluation Research Design

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Psychology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: jemma.berry@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

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: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This 15 point paper provides a theoretical grounding in programme evaluation, with an emphasis on the evaluation of programmes in the not-for-profit sector. Emphasis is placed on qualitative methods, collaborative approaches and evaluation as a strategy of incremental social change. As part of the paper students develop a comprehensive research plan for undertaking an evaluation of a social service or health programme.

This paper focuses on understanding the history of evaluation, major models of programme evaluation and their application, with an emphasis on a New Zealand context. During this paper students will develop a detailed and coherent evaluation research proposal that will utilise different research methods. Specific attributes that successful students will acquire are:

  • An understanding of the role of evaluation research and the major models of evaluation,
  • A basic understanding of project planning, and
  • Experience in formulating a comprehensive evaluation research plan.

We will cover a number of issues relevant to the evaluation of programmes and policies such as the conceptualisation and planning of evaluations, the politics of evaluation, critique of evaluation proposals, and the production of your own evaluation proposal. Particular emphasis is given to the use of qualitative methods and approaches.

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Paper Structure

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This class meets on Fridays during Semester A, 9:00am to 10:50am, in KB.01. The following programme is indicative only. Some changes may be necessary to better align with guest speaker availability and progress on your evaluation proposals.

Please note, there is no examination for this paper. However, for those intending to do PSYCH513-20B, there is an expectation that you (as a member of a group) will negotiate availability to undertake tasks required to obtain ethical approval. Ethical approval will allow groups to begin data collection in B Semester, and is essential for the timely completion of group projects.

Students are expected to take their own lecture notes. Sometimes edited slides will be available to students on Moodle 1 day after the lecture.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Understand the concepts and principles underlying the theory of evaluation
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Critical Reflection & Creative writing (3)
    Evaluation proposal (4)
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of evaluation through familiarity with different models of evaluation and the application of these to different contexts including NZ
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Seminar presentation or On-line Quiz (1)
    Critical Reflection & Creative writing (3)
  • Demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate and apply understanding of evaluation principles and concepts to project plans
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Proposal review (2)
    Evaluation proposal (4)
  • Effectively communicate your critical assessment of evaluation models, processes and methods for evaluation
    This shall be demonstrated by your ability to analyse, synthesis and critique information and apply these to evaluation projects
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Seminar presentation or On-line Quiz (1)
    Proposal review (2)
    Critical Reflection & Creative writing (3)
  • Design an evaluation: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of general & ethical principles of psychological research and then apply these to the design of a small-scale evaluation
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Evaluation proposal (4)
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Assessment

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Because the coursework examination ratio for this paper is 100:0 students must make a genuine attempt to complete all pieces of assessment to a passing standard. The total value of each piece of assessment is such that failure to complete any of these assessments could result in the student receiving a failing grade.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Seminar presentation or On-line Quiz
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Proposal review
22 Apr 2022
5:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Critical Reflection & Creative writing
10 Jun 2022
5:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Evaluation proposal
17 Jun 2022
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Reading Reviews
Sum of Best ( 4 )
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Reading Review 1
21 Mar 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Reading Review 2
4 Apr 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Reading Review 3
18 Apr 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
9. Reading Review 4
9 May 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
10. Reading Review 5
23 May 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
11. Reading Review 6
6 Jun 2022
9:00 AM
-
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Students are required to read all websites, papers and articles that are served via Moodle, distributed in class, or made available through the Faculty Information Centre. The following texts are referenced numerous times throughout the year and are available at the library. Students can purchase copies of these for themselves or loan them from the library.

Thomas, D., & Hodges, I. (2010). Designing and managing your research project: Core skills for social and health researchers. Thousand Oaks, CA.: Sage.
Dahlberg, L., & McCaig, C. (2010). Practical research and evaluation: A start to finish guide for practitioners. Beverly Hills, California:
Sage.
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Recommended Readings

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Other General Reading
Wadsworth, Y. (2011). Everyday evaluation on the run. (3rd edition). St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Creswell, J.W. (2009). Research Design: qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.
Davidson, E.J. (2005). Evaluation methodology basics: The nuts and bolts of sound evaluation. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.
Lunt, N., Davidson, C. & McKegg, K. (2003). Evaluating policy and practice: A New Zealand reader. Auckland: Pearson.
Owen, J.M. & Rogers, P.J. (1999). Program evaluation: Forms and approaches (2nd ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin.
Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative evaluation and research methods (3rd ed.). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
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Online Support

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Graduate Virtual Common Room: This online resource can be found within Psych Café on Moodle. Psych Café: is a communication space available via moodle for students doing graduate study in psychology. This site has been designed to help you locate the resources you are likely to need as a graduate student, to find out what is happening in the School and to network with other graduate students.
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Workload

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You should expect to read 1 to 3 journal articles or book chapters each week, and to engage in your own self directed learning. (This involves project negotiations, meetings as necessary to plan an effective evaluation.) A workload of about 10 hours per week (on average) should be anticipated, although at certain times, this might be exceeded. You can expect to schedule some project work during teaching recess.

The amount of work expected of a typical student in a 20 point paper (offered over one semester) is approximately 12 hours per week, including class contact time; 6 hours per week for a 10 point paper. These figures are only approximations, as papers vary in their requirements and students vary in both the amount of effort required and the level of grades they wish to achieve.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PSYC510, PSYC511

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