PSYCH583-21X (BLK)

Foundations of Community Psychology

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Psychology

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: donna.walsh@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

Welcome to Foundations of Community Psychology!

This paper is a core course for graduate students in Community Psychology and builds on PSYCH302 (Community, Culture and Diversity). It provides an outline of the origins of community psychology, an introduction to some important theoretical models, and a critical examination of a range of applications. We pay particular attention to the emergence of Aotearoa/New Zealand as a bicultural nation. You are strongly recommended to enrol also in PSYCH575 (Kaupapa Māori Psychology).

This paper focuses on history and context in Aotearoa New Zealand, examining the influences for cultural and social justice in communities, organisations, and government agencies, as community psychology works to address inequity and disadvantage. Understanding how structures and systems can sustain and perpetuate injustice, unfairness and hardship in communities is canvassed across the course content, as is identifying strengths, assets and positive qualities that can be strengthened and utilised in communities. Specific attributes that successful students will acquire are:

  • An understanding of Community Psychology values, principles and applications in relation to social justice
  • Understanding how the multiple levels of structures and systems can affect cultural, social and economic justice, and the role of the Treaty of Waitangi
  • Experience in applying social justice to formulating policy.

Through in class and online discussions, group work, assignments and reflective writing, we will use critical multi-level analysis to explore the influences of politics, power, socialisation, colonising activities, and community function, and how these can combine in the development of policy.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

This paper is taught via a combination of on-line learning (Moodle) and three face-to-face workshops.

Students are expected to organise their own notetaking and learning across the online course work and in-person workshops. Presentation slides will be available on Moodle with other resource material.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Understand the origins of community psychology, its values, conceptual frameworks, and the strategies identified with its practice.

    Linked to the following assessments:

    • On-line quizzes and discussions x 5 (1)
    • Presentation (2)
    • Final version of Policy Memo (5)
    • Reflections on learning (6)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Articulate familiarity with a range of scholarship and knowledge that contribute to community psychology.

    Linked to the following assessments

    • On-line quizzes and discussion x 5 (1)
    • Final version of Policy Memo (5)
    • Reflections on learning (6)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Undertake an analysis of a social issue and understand the implications of a community psychology perspective, particularly in the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    Linked to the following assessments:

    • On-line quizzes and discussions x 5 (1)
    • Presentation (2)
    • Draft Policy Memo ( 3)
    • Final version of Policy Memo (5)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate communication skills required for the effective presentation of ideas (both written and oral).

    Linked to the following assessments:

    • On-line quizzes and discussions x 5 (1)
    • Presentation (2)
    • Peer review of two colleagues' draft policy memo (4)
    • Reflections on learning (6)
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate an active, reflective and participatory learning style.

    Linked to the following assessments:

    • Peer review of two colleagues' draft policy memo (4)
    • Final version of Policy Memo (5)
    • Reflections on learning (6)
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

Because the coursework examination ratio for this paper is 100:0 students must make a genuine attempt to complete all pieces of assessment to a passing standard. The total value of each piece of assessment is such that failure to complete any of these assessments could result in the student receiving a failing grade.

Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. On-line quizzes and discussions (5)
30
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
2. Presentation
15
  • In Class: In Workshop
3. Draft policy memo
7 May 2021
9:00 AM
0
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
4. Peer review of two colleagues' draft policy memos
21 May 2021
9:00 AM
10
  • Online: Moodle Forum Discussion
5. Final version of policy memo
4 Jun 2021
9:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Reflections on learning
18 Jun 2021
9:00 AM
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content
There is no set text for this course. Core readings will be supplied prior to relevant sessions.
Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

The following is a list of general reference material.

Books

Carr, S. C., & Sloan, T. S. (2003). Poverty and Psychology: From Global Perspective to Local Practice. New York: Kluwer Plenum.

Cheyne, C., O'Brien, M. & Belgrave, M. (1997) Social Policy in Aotearoa/New Zealand a Critical Introduction. Auckland, New Zealand: Oxford University Press.

Durie, M.H. (1994). Whaiora: Māori Health Development. Auckland Oxford University Press.

Hodgetts, D., Stolte, O., Sonn, C., Drew, N., Carr, S., & Nikora, L. (2020). Social Psychology and Everyday Life. (2nd ed.). L. Zimmerman (Ed.), UK: Macmillan Education.

Kagan, C., Burton, M., Duckett, P., Lawthom, R., & Siddiquee, A. (2011). Critical community psychology. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Kloos, B., Hill, J., Thomas, E., Wandersman, A., Elias, M.J. & Dalton, J.H. (2007). Community psychology: Linking individuals and communities (3rd Ed). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

Levine, M. & Perkins, D.V. (1997). Principles of Community Psychology: Perspectives and Applications (2nd Ed). New York: Oxford University Press.

Levy, M. (2002). Barriers and Incentives to Māori Participation in the Profession of Psychology. Report to the New Zealand Psychologist Board.

Moritsugu, J., Wong, F.Y., & Duffy, K.G. (2010). Community Psychology (4th Ed). Boston: Pearson.

Nelson, G. & Prilleltensky, I. (2010). Community psychology: In pursuit of liberation and well-being. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Orford, J. (2007). Community Psychology: Theory and Practice. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Thomas, D.R. & Veno, A. (Eds) (1996). Psychology and Social Change: Australian and New Zealand Perspectives (2nd Ed). Palmerston North: Dunmore.

Wilkinson, R. D., & Pickett, K. (2009). The spirit level: Why more equal societies almost always do better. London, United Kingdom: Allen Lane/Penguin Group UK, 331

Journals

  • American Journal of Community Psychology
  • Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice http://www.gjcpp.org/en/
  • Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology
  • Journal of Community Psychology
  • Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community
  • The Australian Community Psychologist

Also check out the Resources section near the bottom of the Moodle page for this paper.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
Graduate Virtual Common Room. This online resource, which can be found within Psych Café on Moodle, has been designed to help you locate the resources you are likely to need as a graduate student, to find out what is happening in the School and to network with other graduate students.
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content
This is a 15 point paper. You should expect to spend an average of approximately 10 hours per week on this paper, including reading, class time, online work and completing the assignments. Students are strongly encouraged to attend all 3 one-day, face-to-face workshops to support their online work and assignments.
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

This paper is required for the MAppPsy(Comm). The other required papers are

  • PSYC511 Evaluation resarch design (15 points)
  • PSYC513 Evaluation research analysis (30 points)
  • PSYC575 Indigenous psychologies (15 points)
  • PSYC582 Community health psychology (15 points)
Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: PSYC301 or PSYCH302

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PSYC514 or PSYC583

Edit Linkages Content