SOCIO101-22A (HAM)

Introduction to Sociology

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Sociology and Social Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rosie.webb@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This paper prepares students for further study in a range of social science subjects. It introduces the main sociological theories, concepts and practices that enable an understanding of contemporary societies. We will be using material from the required textbook Being Sociological (3rd edition), as well as readings relating to colonialism in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Textbook: The required text book is Being Sociological (3rd Edition), edited by Steve Matthewman, Bruce Curtis, and David Mayeda. Publisher: Red Globe Press; ISBN 9781352011159.

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Paper Structure

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Timetabled lectures and workshops: This is a HAM and TGA paper, delivered as a flexi-sync paper. The weekly lectures and workshops taken by the paper convenor (Bruce Curtis) will be delivered online (via Zoom), at scheduled times. The lectures and workshops will also be recorded and placed on Panopto, as a backup. The lectures and workshops are interactive - you should read the relevant materials before attending and be ready to ask and answer questions. The tutorials for this paper are delivered as a mix of face-to-face and online options.

Week 1: Being sociological

Week 2: Researching

Week 3: Working

Week 4: Transgressing

Week 5: Becoming

Week 6: Gendering

Week 9: Sexualizing

Week 10: Relating

Week 11: Believing

Week 12: Consuming

Week 13: Mobilizing

Week 13: Workshop on Colonization as myth-making

Week 14: Impacting: The Anthropocene (pre-recorded lecture)

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Apply the sociological imagination to everyday social issues.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Describe the research methods sociologists use to examine society.
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  • Explain the main theoretical paradigms in sociology and use them as a lens to examine social phenomena.
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  • Illustrate how social institutions and culture influence individuals and events, and vice versa.
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  • Demonstrate how individual examples of inequality relate to structural dimensions of inequality.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Essay 1
28 Mar 2022
4:00 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Multi-Choice Test 1
14 Apr 2022
9:00 AM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Essay 2
10 Jun 2022
4:00 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Multi-Choice Test 2
16 Jun 2022
9:00 AM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Textbook: The required text book is Being Sociological (3rd Edition), edited by Steve Matthewman, Bruce Curtis, and David Mayeda. Publisher: Red Globe Press; ISBN 9781352011159.
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Online Support

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Moodle will be used throughout the course.

If a notice is sent out via Moodle, it is assumed you will have received it. If material is placed on Moodle, it is assumed you have access to it. If, for any reason, you are unable to access Moodle, please advise Bruce Curtis.

Students are expected to utilize the material available on Moodle, but must also undertake the independent research to locate further appropriate material for assessments and other aspects of the paper. Reading a range of academic material relevant to the topic is crucial to adequately complete any assignment. Students should first consult the required textbook: Being Sociological (3rd Edition).

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Workload

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This paper is worth 15 points. That implies that students will devote a minimum of 150 ‘learning hours’ to the paper. A full semester workload is 60 points. Therefore, students taking this course must expect to undertake a workload equivalent of around 25% of a full time load for one semester; that is about 10 hours a week for the whole semester (i.e. through to the end of study week). Assessment will be based on the assumption that students have devoted a minimum of 150 hours to the paper.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: SOCY101

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