SOCIO200-20A (NTG)

Modern Sociology and Western Capitalism: A Cosmopolitan Perspective

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rachel.gosnell-maddock@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
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Paper Description

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This paper begins by comparing Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber's theories of 'western capitalist modernity'. Their theories, which found the modern discipline of Sociology, are then considered from the vantage-point of the present. Specific focus is on contemporary debates around themes of globalisation, social classes and stratification, individualisation, and socialism.
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Paper Structure

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Students can take this paper as a face-to-face paper, or as an on-line paper. Either way, all students will experience the paper through the Moodle meta-paper format. All lectures will be on Panopto for use by both Hamilton and net students. Different from Hamilton students, Tauranga students are expected to listen to the lectures on Panopto. Questions for discussion that are raised in lectures will focus and interconnect lectures with on-line exercises (rather than face to face tutorials). Student participation worth 15% will be measured according to participation in the on-line exercises. Nonetheless, Tauranga/ Net students (if they are able or wish) may attend some of the lectures and tutorials on campus, and for which they will be credited.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate essential knowledge of the foundational core of Sociology
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Understand the perspectives of Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx; and differences and similarities between them
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  • Demonstrate a Sociological knowledge of 'western capitalist modernity' both classically and contemporarily
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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At the core of the assessments will be two major essays, including abstracts, each worth 25% of your final grade. Participation is worth 15% and will be measured according to participation in on-line exercises. There will be a final test that will take the form of a single general essay style question that we will talk about beforehand and that is to be completed and submitted on-line within 12 hours of it being issued. An initial assessment, not graded but there will be feedback, will take the form of a draft abstract for your first essay.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. First asignment: outline abstract
3 Apr 2020
No set time
0
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment 2: Essay One
20 Apr 2020
No set time
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assignment Three: Essay Two
5 Jun 2020
No set time
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Online test
35
5. Participation
15
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Recommended Readings

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Edward Royce, 2015, Classical Social Theory and Modern Society is the 'highly recommended' text for this paper.

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Other Resources

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As the paper proceeds, I will direct students to specific texts that can be accessed on-line. Students will also be encouraged to use Google and Wikipedia as helpful resources for summarising concepts and finding sources.


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Online Support

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This paper is directly organised via Moodle. This includes PowerPoint presentations, Panopto recordings, readings, announcements, on-line forums and exercises, essay submission and grading.

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Workload

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Listening to lectures on Panopto, associated reading, and on-line exercises should take about six hours work a week. Further reading and writing, around 20 hours, will be required in order to complete each essay.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisites: LBST101, LABST100, SOCY101, SOCIO101, SOCP102, SOCPY100, WGST101 or WGSTS101

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: SOCY204

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