SOCIO302-20B (HAM)

Globalisation and International Development

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Sociology and Social Policy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rachel.gosnell-maddock@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

This paper is located within 'Development Studies', which is an interdisciplinary field concerned with the changing relation between industrially developed capitalist countries and non-developed countries.

It begins by comparing mainstream and radical perspectives. While the former treat Western models of capitalist modernity including the current neoliberal model as both ideal and achievable for all countries, the latter point to deeply unstable patterns of uneven development across the world's countries caused by the imposition of models of western capitalism. Then, we examine these different approaches in the context of the history of capitalism. Earlier eras of 'world capitalism' including the era of the British Empire and the post World War II Fordist/ USA Empire era are considered. Themes to do with the spectre of slavery and post-colonialism are also considered here. Major emphasis is on development themes central to the contemporary era of neoliberal-led era of capitalist globalisation, US Empire decline, and the spectres of colonialism and slavery.

Finally, we discuss alternatives to Empire and the 'neoliberal model of development'. First, in contrast to Wallerstein's theory of world capitalism which predicts a new era dominated by China; this paper considers the alternative project of 'cosmopolitan democracy' which would signify a movement beyond the age of Empires. Second, we discuss the possibility of a 'democratic socialist model of development' that in contrast to the alt. Right's alternative project of 'regressive nationalism' championed by President Trump, could progressively address uneven development. Third, we discuss how the crisis of the western capitalist project, including western industrial models and forms of knowledge, point towards the need for a cosmopolitan alternative.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

This Hamilton campus based paper offers a mixed method approach which includes videoed lectures, ZOOMed live workshops, and on-line forums. A two hour videoed lecture delivered from my desk once a week will focus the two live discussions and the on-line forum. Students can complete the requirements of this paper via flexible combinations of on-line and live participation. Indeed, some students may complete this paper via completely on-line engagement, while others may attend both live discussion groups every week.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • demonstrate an essential understanding of major approaches to international development
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • identify and distinguish basic elements of major perspectives on different eras of capitalist history
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • demonstrate development studies based knowledge of the experiences of different groups of national states in recent times.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • to think constructively about how to make history in the 21st century
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment one: first essay
24 Aug 2020
No set time
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment Two: second essay
28 Sep 2020
No set time
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assignment Three: Take home test
15 Oct 2020
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Participation
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content
Recommended readings will be identified on Moodle in the context of each week's different themes.
Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content
Lecture notes and readings will be available on Moodle. There will be videoed lectures and live ZOOM discussions that will also be saved to Moodle. There will also be on-line Moodle forums that will include my participation.
Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content

Each week's workload will involve listening to the two hour lecture, doing some reading (2 hours?), and about two hours in workshop and/or on-line forums (72? hours).
The two essays assignments are expected to take about 30 hours (15 hours reading, 15 hours writing) each 2 X 30 = 60
Preparation and undertaking of take home test is expected to involve about 12 hours preparation and 6 hours writing =18
This makes a total of about 150 hours, and a weekly average of 12.5 hours.

Please note that these are just rough guidelines. For example, some students who spend more time doing the weekly tasks of reading, listening to lecture, and participating in on-line forums and workshops will find that they need to spend less time researching for assignments and take home test.

Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: LBST301

Edit Linkages Content