SOCIO302-21B (HAM)

Globalisation and International Development

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Sociology and Social Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rosie.webb@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
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Paper Description

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The present world comprises nation states at different stages of capitalist industrialisation and levels of economic competitiveness. This description of ‘uneven development’ is un-controversial, but explanations and proposed solutions differ markedly. In the critical literature, dominant perspectives emphasise how, like an iron-law of underdevelopment, changing Empire driven forms of capitalist economic development all drive the wealth drain from peripheral poor to core rich countries. Dissenting views contend that Empire is being up-ended by capital’s growth beyond national containment, and that in this capitalist world of global market competition where low wages have become a source of competitiveness rather than ‘unequal exchange’, some lesser developed countries have broken out of the cycle of underdevelopment.

Building on dissenting perspectives, this paper investigates two deeply interconnected processes: the declining role of Empire in the context of ‘de-colonisation’, and the increasing role of mid-range capitalist ‘models of development’ -especially the present ‘neoliberal model of development’- for explaining persisting uneven development. Finally, the paper outlines key elements of a post-western, cosmopolitan, democratic socialist model of development that offers an innovative regulatory solution to the crisis logic of neoliberal-led uneven development.
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Paper Structure

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This Hamilton campus based paper offers a mixed method approach which includes videoed lectures, live workshops, and on-line forums. A videoed lecture delivered from my desk once a week will focus live discussions and the on-line forum.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • demonstrate an essential understanding of major approaches to international development
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  • identify and distinguish basic elements of major perspectives on different eras of capitalist history
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  • demonstrate development studies based knowledge of the experiences of different groups of national states in recent times.
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  • to think constructively about how to make history in the 21st century
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment one: first essay
23 Aug 2021
No set time
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment Two: second essay
27 Sep 2021
No set time
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Assignment Three: Take home test
14 Oct 2021
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Participation
10
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Recommended Readings

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Recommended readings will be identified on Moodle in the context of each week's different themes.
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Online Support

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Lecture notes and readings will be available on Moodle. There will be videoed lectures and live ZOOM discussions that will also be saved to Moodle. There will also be on-line Moodle forums that will include my participation.
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Workload

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Each week's workload will involve listening to the two hour lecture, doing some reading (2 hours?), and about two hours in workshop and/or on-line forums (72? hours).
The two essays assignments are expected to take about 30 hours (15 hours reading, 15 hours writing) each 2 X 30 = 60
Preparation and undertaking of take home test is expected to involve about 12 hours preparation and 6 hours writing =18
This makes a total of about 150 hours, and a weekly average of 12.5 hours.

Please note that these are just rough guidelines. For example, some students who spend more time doing the weekly tasks of reading, listening to lecture, and participating in on-line forums and workshops will find that they need to spend less time researching for assignments and take home test.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: LBST301

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