SOCWK101-19A (TGA)

Introduction to the Social Work Profession

15 Points

Edit Header Content
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Social Work

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: paula.maynard@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: jillene.bydder@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

Paper Description

Edit Paper Description Content

This paper provides students with an opportunity to examine the history and purpose of social work practice internationally, locally, and in the context of Māori and western traditions. Social work practice will be considered as a tool for social change and social control. Ethical practice including understanding oneself along with approaches to self care and supervision will be introduced.

Edit Paper Description Content

Paper Structure

Edit Paper Structure Content

SOCWK101 is taught through lectures, tutorials and guest lectures. The four hours each week will normally begin with a two hour lecture, followed by a tutorial for skills learning and discussion. The lectures will explore the content of the paper through presentations, case study analysis, and discussion. The tutorials will be used for self analysis and skill development. The classes will be held from 9.00am to 1.00pm on Wednesdays. The classroom will be open from 8.50 am. This paper is supported through Moodle and students need to engage with Moodle to access readings, reports, other items of interest, and to submit assignment work.

Edit Paper Structure Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Have an overview of the social work profession, social work practice, and the use of self as a tool
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop a critical understanding of the purpose of the social worker as a social change protagonist, with an understanding of the elements of social control
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop a critical understanding of culture, colonisation, and diversity in Aotearoa New Zealand in order to make linkages with anti-oppressive social work practice
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop an holistic understanding of elements of self-care, as well as the purpose and function of tangata whenua and western approaches to professional supervision
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Develop an understanding of introductory social work communication skills (written and oral) (subsequent skills learning is built upon in other social work papers).
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessment

Edit Assessments Content
  • Students are required to attempt and submit all three pieces of internal assessment for this paper
  • Students who fail to submit the compulsory assignments, if no other provisions have been made under the policy on special consideration for missed assessment, will receive an IC grade
  • The assessments are structured to assess the paper learning outcomes. They are designed to develop critical thinking and determine your ability to apply social work concepts and theoretical frameworks.
Edit Additional Assessment Information Content

Assessment Components

Edit Assessments Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assessment 1: Essay: History of the social work profession
19 Mar 2019
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assessment 2: Oral presentations: Ko wai au?
27 Mar 2019
9:00 AM
32
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
  • Presentation: In Class
3. Assessment 3: Test
29 May 2019
9:00 AM
33
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
4. Class participation
5
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content

Required and Recommended Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

There is one required text for this paper. Hard copies of the required text or earlier editions are available in the library as desk copies.

Connolly, M., & Harms, L. (Eds.). (2013). Social work: Contexts and practice (3rd ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

The latest edition of this text is available in the library as an ebook or students can purchase a hard copy.

Connolly, M., Harms, L., & Maidment, J. (2017). Social Work ebook 4e : Contexts and Practice. Melbourne, AUSTRALIA: OUPANZ.

Additional texts and readings are also listed later in this document. Many readings or a link to the reading sources will be available on Moodle on a weekly basis corresponding to each lecture topic.

Students are expected to read the prescribed readings listed on Moodle before each class to prepare for the lecture.

Edit Required Readings Content

Recommended Readings

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Required readings will be listed weekly on the SOCWK101 Moodle page. Below is a list of highly recommended texts:

Chenoweth, L., & McAuliffe, D. (2015). The road to social work and human service practice (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning

Dale, M., Mooney, H., & O’Donoghue, K. (2017). Defining Social Work in Aotearoa: Forty years of pioneering research and teaching at Massey University. Palmerston North, New Zealand: Massey University Press.

Davys, A., & Beddoe, L. (2010). Best practice in professional supervision: A guide for the helping professions. London, United Kingdom: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Munford, R., & Nash, M. (1994). (Eds.). Social work in action. Palmerston North, New Zealand: Dunmore Press.

Teater, B. (2010). An introduction to applying social work theories and methods. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.

Tennant, M. (2007). The Fabric of Welfare. Voluntary Organisations, Government and Welfare 1840-2005. Wellington, New Zealand: Bridget Williams Books.

Thompson, N. (2015). Understanding social work: Preparing for practice. London, England: Palgrave.

Edit Recommended Readings Content

Online Support

Edit Online Support Content

Moodle will be used as an online learning and communication platform for this paper. Moodle can be accessed from elearn.waikato.ac.nz. All course related communication will be managed through Moodle. Students can contact the lecturer via email or using the message function on Moodle. Students are encouraged to use the ‘Ask your lecturer’ forum available on Moodle if you think that your enquiry could be useful for other students as well.

The lecture notes may not be available on Moodle before the lectures; however students can usually download lecture notes from Moodle within 24 hours of the lecture. Students are advised that reading these notes is not a substitute for attending lectures and taking one’s own notes. The provision of any materials from guest lecturers is at the discretion of the speaker.

Readings or a link to the reading sources will be available on Moodle on a weekly basis corresponding to each lecture topic. Students are expected to read the prescribed readings available on Moodle before each class to prepare for the lecture. Any additional readings will be listed on Moodle.

Edit Online Support Content

Workload

Edit Workload Content

The total hours for this paper are 150 hours (15 points). This paper has 48 hours of class contact time. Please note that the assessment of oral presentations to the class may require additional hours dependent on class size and student availability. Successful completion of the paper will require approximately 102 hours for study and assignment preparation.

The four hours each week will normally begin with a two hour lecture, followed by a tutorial for skills learning and discussion.

  • Students are expected to attend all lectures/tutorials
  • Students are expected to complete the weekly readings in order to come prepared for class discussion on the readings
  • Students are expected to actively participate in classroom activities
Edit Workload Content

Linkages to Other Papers

Edit Linkages Content
SOCWK101 is the first required paper in the BSW and is a prerequisite for SOCWK102.
Edit Linkages Content

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: SOCW101

Edit Linkages Content