TEACH511-21X (HAM)

Ngā Marau Kōtuitui: Connecting the Curriculum (Primary)

15 Points

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Division of Education
Te Kura Toi Tangata School of Education

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: donna.fermanis@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz
: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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In this paper students critically engage with theories, issues, and approaches of curriculum integration. This knowledge and understanding is critically applied to science and mathematics education in primary schools.
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Paper Structure

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This paper involves a 1-hour lecture, a 2-hour workshop and 1.5-hour online activities scheduled for each week (see the accompanying timetable). The lectures will explore fundamental ideas in mathematics and science teaching and learning. The workshops and online activities will support these with experiences to deepen learning.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of theories and approaches to curriculum integration.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Critically examine issues relating to teaching and learning of science, mathematics and statistics, and curriculum integration.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Design a high-quality integrated unit of work that demonstrates application of specialist knowledge and skills.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Evaluate and critically reflect on the teaching and learning process.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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In order to be eligible for a pass in this course, students are required to complete all three pieces of assessment.
General assessment criteria are included below. However, assessment rubrics specific to each assessment task will be available on Moodle.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Background paper
19 Aug 2021
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Planning
31 Aug 2021
11:30 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Reflection
26 Sep 2021
11:30 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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To be advised during the paper. All required readings will be available online. You don't need to buy them in Printshop.
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Recommended Readings

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Beane, J. (2005). A reason to teach: Creating classrooms of dignity and hope. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Boyd, S., & Hipkins, R. (2012). Student inquiry and curriculum integration: Shared origins and points of difference (Part A). SET: Research Information for Teachers, (3), 15–23.

Cianca, S. (2019). Teaching elementary STEM education: Unpacking standards and implementing practice-based pedagogy. New York, NY: Routledge.

Dowden, T. (2014). Challenging, integrated, negotiated and exploratory curriculum in the middle years of schooling: Describing and implementing high quality integration. Australian Journal of Middle Schooling, 14(1), 16–27.

Dowden, T., & Fogarty-Perry, B. (2017). Building citizenship in the middle years: Leading the implementation of student-centred curriculum integration in an Aotearoa/New Zealand school. Australian Journal of Middle Schooling, 17(2), 32–39.

Drake, S.M., & Reid, J.L. (2018). Integrated curriculum for the twenty-first century. In J.P. Miller, M.J. Binder, B. Novak & C. Crowell (Eds), International Handbook of Holistic Education (pp. 118-128). New York, NY: Routledge.

Fraser, D., & Paraha, H. (2002). Curriculum integration as treaty praxis. Waikato Journal of Education, 8.

McDowall, S., & Hipkins, R. (2019). Curriculum integration. Retrieved from https://www.nzcer.org.nz/system/files/Curriculum%20Integration%202018-2019.pdf

Mutch, C. (2013). Progressive education in New Zealand: A revered past, a contested present and an uncertain future. International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(2).

Rennie, L., Venville, G., & Wallace, J. (2012). Knowledge that counts in a global community: Exploring the contribution of integrated curriculum. New York, NY: Routledge.

Snook, I., & O'Neill, J. (2010). Social class and educational achievement: Beyond ideology. New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 45(2), 3.

Thousand, J. S., Villa, R. A., & Nevin, A. I. (2006). The many faces of collaborative planning and teaching. Theory into practice, 45(3), 239-248.

Van de Walle, J. A., Karp, K. S., Lovin, L. H., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2018). Teaching student-centered mathematics: Developmentally appropriate instruction for grades 3-5 (3rd ed., Vol. 2). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Wright, N. (2018). Becoming an innovative learning environment: The making of a New Zealand secondary school. New York, NY: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-981-13-0764-5

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Online Support

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Paper outline, links to readings, assessments and extra resources are provided through Moodle.
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Workload

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Students are expected to spend 150 hours on this paper. The paper involves 24 hours of lectures and workshops and 12 hours of online activities. It is expected that students will spend the rest of their course time preparing for classes/workshops, reading and responding to literature, planning, reflecting, and preparing assignments.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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This paper builds on TEEDU500 and makes connections with TEACH510, TEEDU501 and TEPRO510.
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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: TEEDU500

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

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